nutrition-weight-loss-health-coach

 

Jimmy Moore is one of the most hardworking nutrition experts today. He’s able to balance maintaining multiple websites, writing books, and hosting podcasts and still have enough time for his family. Before all this, Jimmy was far from what anyone would consider a nutrition expert. He weighed over 400 lbs. and didn’t care about what he ate as long as it filled him up and tasted good.

Jimmy tried a lot of fad diets that only made his life miserable. It wasn’t until his mother-in-law gave him Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution in January 2004 that he began to fully grasp the idea of what was keeping him from losing weight. He has since become one of the most popular names in the low-carb diet industry.

Today, Jimmy tells us his story, his many challenges, the events in his life that made him want to change, and the many advances in the ketogenic diet.

“It’s not a dull moment right now in the world of Keto.” – Jimmy Moore

On Today’s Episode of the Low Carb Leader:

  • Jimmy’s story about his dad who was a chief of police and how he warned him about drinking.
  • A lot of people don’t want to know how much they weigh and their health markers.
  • When he started to focus on being a low-carb expert, he didn’t make any money for a while. While he wasn’t in it for the money, he wanted to make sure his family was in a good place.
  • He tells the story of how he turned down a six-figure sponsorship offer despite how he needed money.

 

The Takeaway:

  • Integrity is all you have when everything else is gone.

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

Connect with Jimmy Moore:

 

Subscribe & Review the Low Carb Leader! 

 Thank you for joining us on this week’s episode of the Low Carb Leader Podcast! Our podcast is devoted to helping you attain optimal performance at work and in life. If the topics and interviews we have shared on this podcast have inspired you, please subscribe to the show on iTunes or Stitcher and leave your honest feedback to help us reach even more Low Carb Leaders.

Don’t forget to check us out on Facebook and Twitter and visit our new website!

 

Read Podcast Transcripts

034 – Getting to Know Jimmy Moore (and keto talk too) Part 1

DAN:
Hello, and welcome to The Low Carb Leader podcast. I am your host, Dan Perryman. You have joined me for Episode 34. Our guest today is an author, blogger, podcaster and international speaker. He was born in 1971. He attended the University of Tennessee at Martin where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and English, which makes him extremely smart because I received my political science degree, as well. And then he received a master’s degree in public policy from Regent University.

In January of 2004 he made a decision to get rid of the weight that was literally killing him. At 32 years of age and 410 pounds, the time had come for a radical change of lifestyle. A year later he had shed an amazing 180 pounds, shrunk his waist by 20 inches and dropped his shirt size from 5XL to XL. After his dramatic weight loss he was inundated with requests from friends, neighbors and complete strangers seeking information and help. He now is dedicated to helping as many people as possible find the information they need to make the kind of lifestyle changes that he made. To that end he has started a blog and a number of websites to get out the message of lifestyle change and healthy living. He is the author, or co-author, of numerous books, including Cholesterol Clarity with Dr. Eric Westman, Keto Clarity with Dr. Westman, The Ketogenic Cookbook with Maria Emmerich, The Complete Guide to Fasting with Dr. Jason Fung, 21 Life Lessons from Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb and Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb.

He is also the host and possibly Captain – I have to ask him about that – of The Low-Carb Cruise, which is in its tenth year. Finally, he is also the co-creator of KetoCon, a conference coming this September in Austin, Texas. He can be found all over social media at livinlavidalowcarb.com, fastingtalk.com, ketotalk.com, on Twitter @livinlowcarbman, Facebook Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb, YouTube, YouTube.com/user/livinlowcarbman. And he is on three podcasts. He is the host of the Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show, Keto Talk with Dr. Nally, popularly known as Doc Muscles, and Fasting Talk with Dr. Jason Fung and Megan Ramos. You probably know who I am describing already, but welcome to the show, Jimmy Moore.

JIMMY:
I need to stop doing stuff, man, because it’s going to take two hours to say my bio.

DAN:
Pretty amazing, really. Yeah, I know, yeah.

JIMMY:
And I’m still breathing. That’s half the battle, man, when you have all that going on. It keeps you out of trouble. That’s for sure.

DAN:
I know. I actually had to take a couple deep breaths to get through it. But yeah, congratulations on all of that success.

JIMMY:
Thanks, man.

DAN:
And I saw you at Low-Carb Breckenridge. That was a great conference.

The Growing Popularity of the Keto Diet

JIMMY:
That was a really good conference. What’s interesting about this community now is we’re starting to see really good quality conferences being put on, and they’re popping up everywhere. I literally have been invited to speak at eight of them this year, plus a few little side ones that aren’t explicitly keto, but they’re interested in the subject of ketogenic diets and fasting. So yeah, it’s not a dull moment right now in the world of keto.

DAN:
Yeah, it’s very cool. I’ve only been in the circles for a short period of time, but there is kind of an inner circle, but which is kind of big. I mean it’s kind of a small knit community with a lot of people in it. It’s pretty cool.

JIMMY:
Yeah, and it’s grown. Obviously I’ve been around since 2005 when I started Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb blog and then started podcasting. When I started doing all this there was nobody really out there in an organized fashion doing anything. And now it seems like everybody and their mama’s got a podcast, like yours, which I love the title, by the way. And blogging and social media and attending these conferences, it truly is, if you’re on the cutting edge of what’s happening in health and nutrition right now, being a part of the keto community really is where it’s at.

DAN:
Yeah, that’s very cool. So you grew up in Tennessee?

Jimmy’s Background

JIMMY:
I actually grew up in Pensacola, Florida. I was born in Tennessee, grew up in Pensacola, Florida until I was 14, and then moved back there, graduated high school there, and went to college there.

DAN:
And where were you at in Tennessee?

JIMMY:
So it’s a little town called Bolivar. So if you know what Bolivar is, you win the prize today for the little small town that if you sneeze you miss it kind of thing. It’s a very small town. I think when I was growing up maybe 6000 total people, and it was the big town in with a bunch of smaller towns all around it.

DAN:
So I used to live on the border of Tennessee, Kentucky and Virginia. Is it on the east side or the west side?

JIMMY:
It’s on the western side of Tennessee. It’s near Memphis, about 90 miles east of Memphis.

DAN:
I actually do know where it is because I used to live in Iuka, Mississippi, which is about 80 miles from –

JIMMY:
Yes, so you had to drive through Middleton to get up through Bolivar. And see, I went to church in Middleton, and my dad was Chief of Police of Middleton, Tennessee Police Department. Both criminals he always had to lock up.

DAN:
Was one of them Otis?

JIMMY:
Otis was one of them, and he was always drunk. Had to just let him sober up overnight, yeah.

DAN:
So what was it like being a child with a dad who was – you said the Chief of Police or the Sheriff?

JIMMY:
Well, he was Chief of Police in Middleton. He did end up working for the Sheriff’s department. I do remember when I was a kid that he would sometimes let us ride along with him. One time it was so funny because he had a drunk that he picked up because he was being a public nuisance, and my brother, Kevin, and I were in the backseat. My brother, Kevin, was four years older than me. So Kevin was probably about 11, and I was about seven, and he threw a drunk in between the two of us in the backseat. I was never so scared in my whole life.

DAN:
That is hilarious. Maybe he was teaching you a lesson early on.
JIMMY:
He was like, don’t drink, and I never have drank to this day, at least not to that inebriated point.

DAN:
That’s so funny. So you got your undergraduate in political science. What were you planning on doing?

JIMMY:
Yeah, so the dream when I was in college, undergrad, was to get a degree in political science and English. I’ve always loved writing. I’ve always loved the English language. I was one of those nerd kids that always won the spelling bee in the school and always, you know, was doing writing contests. So I knew English had to be a part of it. So I thought maybe, just maybe, I’d be like a lobbyist on Capitol Hill or something like that. That was kind of the hope and dream until I went for my master’s degree and met my, what would become my wife now of 23 years. When I met her I was like I’m not exposing her to DC life and all of that. So I quickly switched from an aspiring career as a DC lobbyist – although everything about politics has gotten really crazy in the last 20 years, that I’m just so turned off by it. I’m really glad I didn’t go down that as my career path now.

DAN:
Yeah, definitely. So did you have an interest in nutrition? I want you to share your story, but did you have an interest in nutrition before your story?

JIMMY:
My interest in nutrition before my story was what kind of crap can I put in it today? That was about as interested in nutrition as I was. No, to answer your question, I didn’t even know what a carbohydrate was. I didn’t care about what I was putting in the pie hole as long as it made the happy center in my brain and tongue taste good and feel good and all that jazz. I think that’s probably pretty typical of most people that just aren’t aware and don’t care.

DAN:
Yeah, and I actually spent time in Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, so the southern way of eating, for those that don’t know, is pretty high fat, fried food, just really bad for you.

JIMMY:
May I make a caveat about the high-fat? It’s high in the really crappy oil fat. So we’re not cooking in coconut oil. We’re not cooking in butter – well, we might be cooking it butter if you’re Paula Deen, but we’re not deep frying things in good oils. We’re deep frying them in these very highly rancid omega six-rich, soybean oil, cottonseed oil types of fats. Those are not healthy fats. So yes, it’s high-fat, but let’s give the qualifier that it’s not the kind of fats that we’re going to talk about here in a minute that I’m now promoting as healthy.

DAN:
Right. I never saw coconut oil in the gas stations. And for those that have lived in the South know exactly what we’re talking about because you go into a gas station and there’s just fried food everywhere in the gas stations. So kind of walk us through your story. So you got up to a very high weight of 410 pounds, which is pretty bad for your health. And kind of – go ahead.

Jimmy’s Weight Loss Story

JIMMY:
And what’s interesting about that – I want to paint the picture a little bit because yes, I was 410 pounds when I weighed January 1, 2004, but here’s the thing. I never thought, Daniel, that I weighed that much. I think the disconnect with my diet, like I mentioned earlier, it also was a disconnect in actually how bad the problem had gotten. When I started the diet that we’ll talk about here in a minute, when I started it I thought okay, I’m probably about 330. That’s what I thought I was. Again, hadn’t been on a scale in years because none of them would weigh me anymore. And so I didn’t know. And so when I went to try to find out how much I did weight, I went down to the gym. There was a YMCA. It didn’t go high enough. I was like okay, this is kind of weird. I think it went to like 320, 330, and it wouldn’t weight me. And then I went to another place, and it wouldn’t weight me. And I’m going, what in the world is going on? And finally I went to a Gold’s Gym, and the Gold’s Gym, before I even went there I said, all right, how high does it go to weigh you? Oh, it goes to 500 pounds, bro. And I was like okay, well, I’m nowhere near 500 pounds. Let’s step on the scale. And when I saw four as the first number, my heart literally sunk. I was just devastated. I was like how – what? I didn’t know that it had gotten that bad.

DAN:
Wow, and I think that’s a good lesson that you don’t wake up weighing 400 and some pounds. It’s a gradual increase day after day, year after year. And that’s very interesting that you thought you weighed almost 100 pounds less than what you actually did.

JIMMY:
Exactly right. And I think there’s a lot of people, they don’t want to know. And so what I try to do in my work now is say look, you should know, not just your weight, but you should know your health markers. You should know where you stand. I was just at a conference that I spoke at about a week ago, and I asked them about inflammatory markers and if anybody knew what their like hs-CRP, which is a key inflammation marker in the body, if they knew what their number was. Maybe 5% of the audience knew. And so the rest of the audience had no clue what their level of inflammation is, which we now know is kind of at the center of all chronic disease, inflammation. If you don’t know that number you need to know. And so I didn’t, at that time, care about my weight, my insulin, my blood sugar, my inflammation markers. None of that was on my radar screen.

DAN:
So what changed that?

JIMMY:
So it’s an interesting thing because people are like, well what’s the epiphany moment where you made all these life changes? And I wish I could say it was like one singular moment. I’d say it was kind of a series of moments. I remember I was substitute teaching in a high school at the time, and this little kid in the back of the room – I could hear him on the right-hand side. I was writing the lesson on the board. It was an English class, of all things. I love English, and so they let me teach a lot of English classes. And so I was writing the lesson on the board, and from the back of the room I heard this little boy say, “Man, Mr. Moore, you’re really fat.”

DAN:
Oh wow.

JIMMY:
Ouch. Of course, you know what happened. The whole class started busting out laughing. I turned around and started laughing to keep from crying and went yeah, kid, yeah, you’re right. I am. And this was just months before I started my life change. And I said okay, that shook me pretty good. And then I’d get in and out of cars, and if you’ve ever bought those big and tall pants, they’re not cheap. They’re like 90 bucks. And so I kept ripping these big and tall pants. I’m going, what in the world? And it was just kind of getting me to start the juices flowing of okay, maybe I need to try something.

Part of the issue is I had tried things over the years, and people like, why didn’t you just do something? I was doing all kind of stuff. I did Dexatrim. I did every low-fat diet in carnation you could possibly think of. I remember in high school between 11th and 12th grade I did SlimFast. And if you’ve ever done SlimFast, it ain’t a fun experience. So I had literally done it all. And famously in 1999 I actually did do a no-fat diet. That was the year my brother had three straight heart attacks in the span of a week that nearly killed him, eventually did kill him at the age of 41, but it was all of these kind of mantras of conventional wisdom that kept rearing their ugly head, Daniel, where I would say, okay, I need to do something. So the default was I need to cut my fat and cut my calories and exercise more. That’s what we’ve always been told. And so nothing shifted that paradigm until I got a diet book for Christmas.

So I got a diet book for Christmas from not just anybody, from my mother-in-law. So I just found out the story of how she gave me that book just this past Christmas. I was like you know you gave me that book all that years ago and it changed my life in many ways. Tell me why you gave me that book. And so she said oh, I was in the grocery store, and I saw it there, and I decided to pick it up. And John and I – John’s her husband, my father-in-law – John and I started doing this diet, and we liked it, and we thought you might like it. And so I was like, wow, how cool is that to see a book in a grocery store and pick it up on a whim and then it have such a profound impact on my life? And now that I’m writing books, you know, my aspiration is maybe that comes full circle, that maybe Keto Clarity ends up in a grocery store and somebody sees it, oh, this would be great for so-and-so, and it changes their life. It’s funny how life does that.

DAN:
I’m guessing it was Atkins maybe?

JIMMY:
Yeah, oh, I’m sorry. I’m getting there.

DAN:
Oh, okay.

The Diet Book that Changed Jimmy’s Life

JIMMY:
Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution was the book, yes, I’m sorry. Yeah, so she gave that to me, and I started looking at this book and going, okay, eat less carbohydrate. Is this guy out of his mind? How do you have any energy at all if you don’t eat carbs? Eat more fat? This guy is a cardiologist, and he’s saying eat the very thing that we know – this is what I was thinking at the time, the whole conventional wisdom – we know leads to clogged arteries, and heart disease, and heart attacks, and you’ll die. But I was like you know what, if this is something that can work, I really need to give it an honest go. And I had never done a low-carb high-fat diet before. And so January 1, 2004 I was like, okay, here we go. Let’s do this as a New Year’s resolution. And what turned in – what started off as a New Year’s resolution actually turned into a new life resolution at that point. And I had no idea when I started this diet just how much my life would change forever.

So the first month I lost 30 pounds of my 410-pound body. So I was a very svelte 380 pounds after the end of that first month and had so much energy I had to exercise. So the second month I added in maybe like 10, 15 minutes of treadmill walk, which I tell people I was lifting weights because when you’re 410, 400 pounds you’re lifting a lot of weight. So I lost another 40 pounds the second month. By the end of 100 days it was 100 pounds gone, and I was like, you know, there’s something to this. There’s something about this that’s different for me that my body was responding so, so well. By the end of the year I did lose 180 pounds and literally transformed my life, my physical life, but also my career started to change because I wasn’t happy in all the jobs that I was in at the time. And I always felt like I always hit this glass ceiling that I could never get above, I think because of my weight. And so when this experience happened for me, Dan, I was able to get exposure on the Atkins site. They told my story on the front of their site. And I started having all these people writing to me, encouraging me to like write a book and do a blog and blah blah blah.

And keep in mind this is 2005, so very little of that stuff was really mainstream in the health realm. Now everybody and their mama has a podcast and a blog and everything. At that time I was basically blazing a new path for people that want to be a health entrepreneur, and I was like okay, what the heck. I love writing, so let’s start blogging. So April 2005 started Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb blog. Yes, I was a fan of Ricky Martin at the time. What’s funny is if you put in Livin’ La Vida Loca today in a Google search I think you actually find some of my stuff first.
DAN:
Well, there’s only a few of us who probably know who Ricky Martin still is.

JIMMY:
Yeah that’s right. I saw on a plane ride back from that trip I was at where I spoke in the little magazine for the airline that he’s in Vegas now doing some shows. So he’s still out there. I’m sure he’s doing –

DAN:
So going back to right before you started keto and then 30 days later you said you had a lot of energy when you were 30 pounds down. Did you know how bad you felt going into it, or did you realize how bad you felt after you lost weight?

JIMMY:
Both. I think when you get to that point – and one thing I didn’t mention about my story, I was on three prescription medications at the time, as well, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and respiratory issues. I came off the respiratory medicine. I stopped wheezing within three weeks. And then my blood pressure, I came off of that within about a month and a half, two months, because I kept passing out or at least blacking out when I’d stand up, and my wife’s like, are you still taking the meds for blood pressure? Yeah. Stop it. So I threw them in the garbage can. I never took them again. And then the cholesterol one I held onto for the longest time because I was still fearful that I was going to have a heart attack or whatever. I have since learned I am not in danger. So yeah, I think it was just one of those you don’t know how bad you actually feel because you’ve gotten used to how you feel in your current state, that you don’t know what better feels like until you’re better.

DAN:
Right, exactly.

JIMMY:
I knew I felt bad, but I was 32, so that mitigated a lot of the pain. If I started at 42 I think it would have been a different beast altogether. I think some people that get into this because they waited so long for it to get so bad, for me it manifested as morbid obesity and not really a lot of pain. But for some others they wait until the pain is so great, and of course they feel huge pain alleviation once they start this. But yeah, to answer your latter question, yes, once I started I was like well dang, this is what normal is supposed to feel like. And I had never felt that in my entire life.

DAN:
So compare yourself at 410 and compare yourself 180 pounds lighter. What’s the difference just in the way you move, the way you think, the energy levels because I think there’s a lot of people listening right now that maybe have extra weight on, and they’re probably questioning your story saying well how is this possible, and how can I get to where I need to be? So just kind of talk through maybe what you were thinking and how it has really changed everything in your life.

Becoming Visible for the First Time

JIMMY:
Can I give you the surprising aspect of all of this because I think this is the thing I had no idea was coming? I got so much attention for the first time in my life. So I told you I lost 100 pounds in 100 days. It wasn’t until I was down over 100 pounds – somewhere around 105, 110 pounds lost, that anybody noticed. So I had lost a significant amount of weight, triple digit weight, and people still weren’t saying anything. It wasn’t until it was a little more and people were like, did you change your hairstyle, or did you get your haircut? What’s going on? Something’s different about you. And they didn’t notice. And the interesting thing is people that had never said a single word to me ever when I was 410, I was invisible to them, suddenly started talking to me. That was fascinating to me because I was thinking, I’m the same person. Okay, I’m physically less weight now, but I’m still that same person underneath all the blob, so to speak. It just, it was amazing to me that I was so invisible when I was bigger, and yet when I’m smaller I’m suddenly very visible and they want to talk to me and have a conversation. That was probably the most shocking thing that happened right after losing the weight was all these people that suddenly wanted to be Chatty Cathy with me. I’m like, okay –

DAN:
That’s kind of incredible.

JIMMY:
– where were you when I was like needing a buddy and needing some encouragement? They weren’t there because I guess we see through people that we see as undesirables. And I’m getting really deep here, but – and I don’t know if this is the question you were wanting, but this –

DAN:
Yeah, no, go ahead. Yeah, this is interesting.

JIMMY:
I mean it was fascinating to me. And even within my own self I found that as I got lighter and kept losing weight my own individual confidence level soared through the roof. So maybe I was a little more reserved – although anybody that knows me knows I’m very bombastic, and I’m out there, and I’m not shy at all. But it became that much more magnified, the confidence that I had in myself and my own ability and in wanting to initiate conversation with people. I was free. And again, for the first time in my life I felt like this – I felt like I was finally the man that God had made me to be that I never felt comfortable in that skin because of how I looked on the outside.

DAN:
That is so cool. You mentioned that you had a bunch of jobs before you lost weight and that probably your weight, or maybe your weight stopped you from progressing. What jobs did you have, and kind of talk us through that because I find that very interesting.

JIMMY:
Yeah, you mentioned my dad earlier. He was the Chief of Police in Middleton, Tennessee. Well, he went on to create some small businesses. So he opened up some restaurants when I was growing up. So he owned a restaurant in Middleton and a couple in Bolivar. So he had these restaurants, and of course I started watching the employees and the dynamic there. And of course I was free labor for Dad, so doing all these things around the restaurant. So when I got to college, what industry did I go into? Of course it was customer service-type jobs, and specifically restaurants. So I worked a little bit in Shoney’s. I worked at Taco Bell. Got to grad school in Virginia Beach and worked for a pizza delivery. I literally did every single like menial kind of job you could possibly think of. He really instilled in me a work ethic, an ethic that I think still serves me well today doing five podcast and writing multiple books year after year after year.

So I’m a hard worker, and I always had that within me. And I worked in jobs, customer service-type jobs in retail. So I worked in stores. There was a Christian bookstore chain in Virginia that I was working in the store, and went on to become a manager of a store, then went on to get into the corporate office and became a purchasing, a buyer. And I was thinking, okay, maybe at some point I’ll become a vice president. And it just never manifested. And I’m thinking what in the world is going on? And then I finished up my master’s degree and get my thesis done and work for another company. And again, get to a pretty good level in this major company and just stopped. And I would always apply for those higher jobs and was always overlooked. And I can’t help but think it was the weight because we don’t want to pretend like we don’t have biases. Everybody has their biases, and one of the biases that’s out there, Dan, is people think fat people are stupid. And so maybe that was part of what happened there. If you’re listening to this right now and you’re overweight and you feel like people think you’re stupid, prove them wrong. That’s what I did.

DAN:
That’s a great point. We actually had talked about this in the past, a few people I work with. And you look at the top CEOs in companies, like big companies, and honestly, I mean it’s unfortunate, they kind of do have the same look. They’re not overweight. You know, people that are thin and kind of move to the top. You can’t prove that that was the reason, but if you look at the facts, it seems that there may be a ceiling for people that are overweight just because of the way, the perception of the way companies look at them. And it’s unfortunate. It really is.

Pursuing Your Passion

JIMMY:
But you know what the coolest thing is? We live in the United States of America where dreams are possible, and when I decided to go full time doing what I do now, promoting health and healthy living and nutrition and doing it on my own, that was October of 2006 that I decided to go full-time with this. And I’ve got to tell you it was scary. My wife thought I was nuts. Christine was like, you’re going to do what? I said you know what, I have such a passion for this, and I don’t feel like I’m getting anywhere in all the jobs that I’ve been in. My career working in customer service, it’s only going to take me just so far. I think I have more ability that I can take this and run with it and be highly, highly successful.

And of course, again, 2006, I hadn’t proved anything. And so she’s like, gulp, let’s do this. She wasn’t very happy about it. And then her dad later on, just a couple years ago, mentioned, I thought you were nuts. I thought you were going to put my daughter in the poor house and you guys were going to live on welfare for the rest of your life. And I said no, I again, grew up in a very heavy work ethic type of home. Dad taught me that very strongly as a kid. And I’ve always worked extraordinarily hard to get what I want. And I’ve always believed in America that if you put your mind to it and you want to do something, you will succeed at what you want to do. You just have to put in the work. And I put in literally hundreds, if not thousands and thousands of hours before it finally started paying off.

DAN:
Well, scary was the word I was going to use because –

JIMMY:
Scary is a good word.

DAN:
Yeah, because 2006, that’s 11 years ago. That was so far ahead of the low-carb curve.

JIMMY:
Not only low-carb curve, but I would say a lot of the technology curve. Keep in mind what was it, the iPhone only came out in what, 2005, 2006, whatever it was. It didn’t really take off until maybe 2009, 2010. So I’m ahead of the curve of when podcasts are like instantly available at your fingertips on your smart phone, and nobody was really doing this kind of thing in the realm of health. And so I literally was blazing new territory. I remember when I went to my tax guy the first year after doing this as my quote job. He’s like, what do you do? I went, uh, I don’t think you have a code for it yet. We ended up, later on, now that I started writing books – oh, he’s an author. And so author is a lot easier than professional blogger, podcaster, dishwasher, whatever you want to call him.

DAN:
Well I just attended the social media conference out in San Diego, and there is a lot of young entrepreneurs that are wanting to start podcasts and blogs and make a bazillion dollars right away. I know we’re going to talk about keto in a second, but talk us through – it’s not overnight success by any means, right?

JIMMY:
Oh gosh no. I didn’t make any money for a little while. I would say probably two years. And not that I was in it for the money, but I did want to make sure that that little lady in yonder is taken care of and our needs are taken care of. I didn’t need to be rich, by any means. I just wanted to make sure our bills were paid for because I’m in my passion. So when you’re promoting your passion, money is really not the object of your desire, of what you’re trying to do. And it never has been for me. It’s always been about educate, inspire and encourage people. So if I’m doing those three things and it happens to be done well and people happen to like it, oh yeah, by the way, I guess I’ll make a little money in the process of doing that. So that’s always been my philosophy is never put the focus on the money, and then you never get bogged down by it. So it kills me the people, like you just described, that say well I’m going to get into podcasting and get into doing this so I can make a killing. You’re in it for the wrong reason. Go away.

DAN:
I hear that all the time. People are saying, well, are you going to monetize the podcast? And really the reason – I don’t even sell anything. I’m just doing this because I think the message is important, and I’m getting to meet a lot of very cool people. And if I never make – I’m a hospital CEO, so I’ve got a job. But as long as I can do this and share the message, it really is my passion, as well. People always want to know oh, how can you make money, but I agree with you 100%. If you go after the money it is not going to work.

JIMMY:
I’ll give you a story. Early on when I started blogging and started the podcast I had a company that was promoting this white bean extract carb blocker. And of course I thought those things were hocus-pocus, stupid anyway. Just don’t eat the carbs, and then you can block all the cards that you don’t want to eat. So they threw at me a six-figure promotional thing if I would start promoting their product. And I said I can’t sell my integrity because integrity is all you have. When everything else is gone all you’ve got left is your integrity and your reputation. And if I start promoting something that I, in my heart of hearts, know is not going to help people, then all the money in the world doesn’t cover up for that sin.

So I refused a $100,000 marketing deal. Early on, when I really needed the money, I turned it down because I knew that if I kept my integrity that it would pay off someday. And now it is paying off. People trust me because I’m very careful about who I allow to be a sponsor. I’m very careful about any associations that I have. And I’ve made mistakes, too. Let’s be completely honest there. There are some times when I’ve made mistakes and promoted something. There was a low-carb bread company that I promoted that I thought was good, and it turned out they were a fraud. There was a company that was promoting a weight loss plan that was low-carb. It later was turned out to be a fraud. And so you know, you’re going to make mistakes along the way, but that shouldn’t stop you from pursuing the greater purpose of being full of integrity in every single business transaction that you do.

0 Comments