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Have you ever wondered how your nutrition and the nutritional supplements you take each day affect your overall health? Many doctors, nutritionists, and even fitness trainers recommend taking a multi-vitamin or nutrition supplement to their patients and clients because, in today’s society, most people aren’t getting the vitamins and nutrients they need in their normal daily diet.

This week, I’m talking with Dr. Stephen Lewis and his wife Janet about the use of dietary supplements and how they affect your lab test results as well as your overall health and wellness. Dr. Lewis is a chiropractor with a long history of helping people achieve their maximum potential. After seeing a growing need throughout our society, Dr. Lewis and Janet have teamed up with Doctor’s Nutrition to offer very low-cost blood work to determine the most appropriate nutritional products that are only available through a doctor’s office.

His wife, Janet, is a Certified Natural Health Consultant who has studied with numerous national-leading alternative health experts and has a unique perspective on alternative and complementary nutrition.

They join me on the show today to share their health journey, discuss nutritional supplements and their effects on your body and overall health and wellness, as well as provide their insight on how nutritional supplements affect your blood lab results.

In the Beginning

Before Dr. Stephen and Janet discovered Doctor’s Nutrition, Janet was suffering from significant health problems. After having a hysterectomy at the age of 35, Janet’s interest in nutrition and the role it plays in our overall health and well-being grew. She explains that after her surgery, she gained a lot of weight and began feeling very tired.

Then, they discovered Doctor’s Nutrition. She decided to have her blood tested and learned that she was missing a lot of key nutrients her body needed to perform optimally. They decided to try a natural approach to fixing Janet’s health and nutrition issues.

We have the best medical profession in the world, but there’s something missing with America being so sick.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

Nutritional Values in Today’s Foods

Dr. Stephen explains that when you put nutrients into the body through proper nutrition, “people’s bodies bloom.” The problem, however, is that in today’s society – a society filled with fast food restaurants, improperly portioned meals, and pesticides used on crops – people are not getting the proper nutrition their bodies need. What’s worse, when we skip meals, because our food is not nutrient dense, we are setting ourselves up for poor nutrition and health.

“Good health can be had, you just kind of have to go down a little bit different path.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

Chinese Medicine vs. American Medicine

Dr. Stephen and Janet shared their experience of travelling to China, seeing The Great Wall and the Terracotta Warriors as well as studying with the Chinese medical doctors. He explains that the Chinese see health and practice medicine much differently than the way we do in America. For example, instead of checking a patient pulse to check their heart rate – they check if its thin and thread.

“It’s amazing what the body will tell you if we just knew what to look at.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

Traditional Medicine Has Its Place – and It’s Flaws

Everyone knows that traditional medical doctors are tied by a specific set of guidelines, procedures to practice, and perimeters for standard care. Because of this, many people blame medical professionals for improper diagnosis or improperly treating their illness or health problems. Dr. Stephen explains that this mindset should never happen because it’s not the doctor’s fault. Instead, it’s because of the strict standards and what insurance companies will allow.

If we take the barriers down, we are able to help a whole lot more people get well.” – Janet Lewis

Comparing Nutritional Supplements with Lab Results

A lot of over-the-counter grade vitamin and mineral supplements often don’t work as well as they should. This is often evident when you have your blood tested to evaluate your nutritional levels. The problem is, though, that blood tests are incredibly expensive for most people – even with insurance. This is often why most people – and doctors – do not conduct enough lab tests to identify what their bodies need to function optimally and properly.

Dr. Stephen and Janet explain that in order to achieve optimal health, you need frequent lab tests conducted to see which nutrient levels to improve. They explain that, at Doctor’s Nutrition, they provide lab tests – at cost – to their patients to help them identify their nutritional trouble areas. Then, they provide them with the proper nutritional supplements they need, which are pharmaceutical grade – which means they will actually move the lab values much better than an over-the-counter supplement.

Doctor’s Nutrition Lab Panels

Doctor’s Nutrition offers a wide range of blood tests and panels, including CBC, CMP, Lipids and thyroid panels as well as a specific set of tests for people struggling with pain and digestion issues.

Dr. Stephen explains that the key tests to take to get a baseline of your nutrition levels are:

  • CBC
  • Cortisol – testing stress levels
  • Thyroid and Free T3
  • C Reactive Protein

Thyroid Health

We discussed thyroid health and the various factors that can contribute to thyroid problems. Dr. Stephen explains that the reason he orders a full thyroid panel, which includes testing TSH levels as well as Free T3s and T4s, is because only testing TSH levels does not provide doctors with a full picture of what is going on in the thyroid’s health.

Thyroid problems are not just a “women’s health” problem – it can affect men, too. Dr. Stephen believes that the reason we typically see thyroid problems and complications in women is because “women pay attention to their bodies much better than men.”

“Many times, they test just the TSH, which is the brain getting a signal. The true thyroid function is in the Free T3.” – Janet Lewis

Thyroid Health Problem Contributors:

  • Plastics and pesticides
  • Chlorines and bromines
  • Fluoride (like in your toothpaste)

After reading and recommending – literally – dozens of books regarding thyroid health, Dr. Stephen decided to write his own, titled Thyroid Sniper: Shoot’n Straight with Dr. Stephen Lewis, D.C. The book outlines the nutritional deficiencies that can add to a thyroid problem as well as various auto-immune diseases that can affect the thyroid – such as Hashimoto’s disease. It also explains the effects of iodine on the body for a person with Hashimoto’s, and his beliefs of the “safe dose” of iodine for these patients as well as the importance of finding the right balance.

“You’re an individual and you should be treated as such.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

Anxiety & Stress Effects on Gut Health

Everyone may know that stress and anxiety play a major role in your overall health and well-being, but most people are unaware of the implications and complications it has specifically to your gut.

We discussed the link between constipation, gut health, and stress and anxiety with Janet and Dr. Stephen. I think Janet summed it up easily and eloquently when she said:

“If you had 3 trains go through a tunnel, how many should come out on the other side? And if they are not coming out, where do they go – which is an even bigger problem.” – Janet Lewis

In other words, if you eat three meals a day, you should be “going” three times a day also – within 30 minutes to one hour after eating a meal. As Dr. Stephen says: “Your GI tract has everything to do with stress, anxiety, and depression.”

Gluten Sensitivity & Intolerance

A few years ago, the term “gluten intolerance” wasn’t used or known as widely as it is today. In fact, in many circles within the medical profession – as well as mainstream – it was viewed as a conspiracy theory or something that affected only a small percentage of people – such as those with Celiac disease. But, today, gluten sensitivity and gluten intolerance is becoming much more well-known throughout the medical profession as well as mainstream public.

Dr. Stephen explains that by looking at what gluten does the the microvilli of the intestines and how it impedes nutrient uptake, some of the research shows that there is 40-times the amount of gluten in wheat than there was in 1970. He explains that some gluten intolerances in today’s society is due to genetics – such as Celiac and Crohn’s disease – but approximately half of today’s society has a broken gene called 5-MTHRF. This gene is typically broken at different degrees, which can lead to gluten intolerances as well as stress, depression, obesity, various types of cancer, fibromyalgia, and even infertility.

Doctor’s Nutrition Supplements

So, why does Dr. Stephen and Janet believe so strongly that the supplements provided by Doctor’s Nutrition are better than other nutritional supplement formulas?

“Well, because we just won’t compromise. You just don’t compromise. What you put into the Temple of the Holy Spirit does matter.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

“And, the products we have are generally 3-5 times stronger than what you are buying over-the-counter.” – Janet Lewis

Dr. Stephen & Janet Lewis’ Low Carb Health Tips

  1. Stay away from grain – this includes bread, grain cereal, pasta, rice, and potatoes.
  2. Eat like the farmers used to eat – lean meats and vegetables.
  3. Shop around the outside of the store – stay away from the middle.
  4. Don’t microwave in plastic.
  5. Steer clear of Styrofoam and styrene cups.
  6. Try to avoid plastic water bottles. If you do have to use bottled water, check to make sure the label says, “filtered with reverse osmosis.”
  7. Take probiotic supplements.
  8. Choose organic over “all-natural.”

Benefits of Reverse Osmosis Filtration

  • Filters out smaller impurities better than other filtration processes.
  • Filters out approximately 99.9% of fluoride and chlorine in tap water.

 

Chlorine-based pesticides used to disinfect drinking water are one of the biggest causes of cancer.

“You have to know what you are getting. You have to know that it is 3rd-party tested.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

First Steps to Getting Healthier

  • Step 1 – Find your “need behind the need.” Why do you want better health?
  • Step 2 – Get your lab work done.

“Find a reason for living. There’s a difference between living and existing. Death is not wrong, we are all going to die, but I think the biggest sin in life is being here and not really living while we are here.” – Dr. Stephen Lewis

Start Your Journey to Healthy Living

To start your journey to healthier living and identifying what your body needs to achieve optimal health, visit ACutAboveNaturals.com and take their health survey!

Read Podcast Transcript

043 – Understanding Lab Work and Nutritional Supplements with Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis 

 

SUZANNE:

I’m Suzanne Perazzini from strandsofmylife.com, and you’re listening to The Low Carb Leader.

 

DAN:

Hello, and welcome to The Low Carb Leader podcast. I am your host, Dan Perryman, and you have joined me for Episode 43. Today we have a great interview with Dr. Stephen Lewis and his wife, Janet Lewis. We will be talking about lab testing and supplements and how they affect your overall health. Before we get into the interview I just want to remind you please visit me at thelowcarbleader.com where you can find all the podcasts, a blog, and you can find links to all my social media sites. All right, I know you will enjoy this interview, so let’s get into it. Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis.

 

On today’s show we have Dr. Stephen Lewis and Janet Lewis. Dr. Lewis is a chiropractor. They have a long history of helping people achieve their maximum potential. Dr. Lewis stays current on the latest research pertaining to nutritional supplements and optimal health. Janet is a certified natural health consultant with a unique perspective on alternative and complementary nutrition from studying with numerous national leading alternative health experts. Paramount in their education was their trip to China while studying with traditional Chinese medical doctors. Dr. Lewis and Janet know the importance of proper nutrition in the healing process and the maintenance of the human body. After seeing a growing public need, they teamed up with the Doctor’s Nutrition to offer extremely low cost bloodwork to determine the most appropriate nutritional products that are only available through a doctor’s office. So welcome to the show, Dr. Lewis and Janet.

 

What Led Dr. Lewis and Janet to Doctor’s Nutrition

 

JANET:

Well, thank you for having us.

 

  1. LEWIS:

Good to be here.

 

DAN:

All the way from Texas, right?

 

JANET:

I know.

 

LEWIS:

You bet.

 

JANET:

Big state.

 

DAN:

Did you both grow up in Texas?

 

JANET:

Yes, I grew up close to Dallas and Fort Worth. My husband here is from East Texas in a little town called Hughes Springs.

 

LEWIS:

Yeah, well East Texas redneck, you know, rural.

 

DAN:

Yeah, well I spent 10 years in the South, in Alabama, and Mississippi and Kentucky, and I do note a slight accent in both of you.

 

JANET:

And he’s got the mustache and the boots and the whole Texas thing going.

 

DAN:

Yeah, I saw the picture. Yeah, that’s awesome. Janet, why don’t we start with you? Do you want to introduce yourself to the listeners and tell us a little bit about the natural health consultant?

 

JANET:

Yes, Dr. Lewis is the brains of the operation. I am the one who got to experience a lot of it physically, so together I guess we formed Doctor’s Nutrition from me having some health problems, from him always being in nutrition and being even more interested in it after I went through a hysterectomy at age 35. I’m just slightly older than that now, but won’t say.

 

LEWIS:

Yeah, she’s 32.

 

JANET:

Going the medical route after the surgery I gained a whole lot of weight. I was very tired and realized there had to be something different, so we found Doctor’s Nutrition and learned about the low-cost lab work and ran that and realized that I was missing a lot of things nutritionally. And thank goodness my husband is smart enough to put it together and tell me what that was.

 

JANET:

All right. Dr. Lewis?

 

LEWIS:

Well she humors me. Actually Janet is very incredibly intelligent. What we’ve done, we try the natural approach, and we tell people we have the best medical profession in the world, which I definitely do believe, and the medical profession has saved my bacon more than once. But there is something missing with America being so sick. And on most scales we’re the dead last in overall health, but in spite of a good medical profession. So what’s missing in our diet? My daddy died early at 53, you know, complications from ulcerative colitis and things that are generally pretty easily fixed through natural medicine. That was kind of my wake-up call is I was 15 when daddy died, and it’s like well you know that kind of was traumatic, so I tried to learn natural medicine, and it’s amazing when the chiropractors and osteopaths and medical doctors work together and we treat a massive amount of nurses and a few medical doctors and their families, and I think there’s room for both. And I think each one can help the other one be more effective. So we kind of have a good relationship there.

 

Yeah, I was always a chiropractor, and although I was very successful at that, my major emphasis was more into nutrition, and I just see people bloom when you put nutrients in the body and what the body can do with it because our food is just not nutrient dense even compared to the 1970s. And it’s full of chemicals, things that are not healthy. And we have some clients like one in London, I said well, for your allergies you need to quit eating this, this, this and this. He said stop, Doc. He said we don’t eat that stuff in England. We won’t even let some of those genetically modified organisms in the country. And I said yeah, okay. So the lack of health in America I think is a multifaceted thing that we can visit different areas about, well, it’s nutrition, or its toxins, or it’s the consumerism. And we get too hurried and have lost our sense of humor. We just approach it from whatever the patient seems to need. And good health can be had. You just kind of have to go down a little bit different path.

 

Blending Eastern and Western Medicine for the Best Results

 

DAN:

Talk a little bit about your trip to China and studying with the Chinese medical doctors. And how has that influenced the way you practice?

LEWIS:

Well, we took a lot of different courses here in America, and when we did go it was pretty interesting. Part of it was just sightseeing and seeing the Great Wall and the terra-cotta warriors. Xi’an, the Forbidden City, had lunch in their equivalent of the White House. And then we flew off to a governor’s mansion in a different province. But there were a lot of courses given by Chinese medical doctors, traditional Chinese medicine. We went to Beijing teaching hospital and kind of looked around there and went to the world’s oldest herbal pharmacy, which was really incredible. I think they started that in the 1600s. But they look at things much differently than we do. They will not check pulse to check heart rate, but they’ll see if it’s thin and thready. They’ll look at your eyes. They’ll look at your hands. They’ll look at your tongue. And it’s amazing what the body will tell you if we just knew what to look at. And kind of simply put they think conditions can be hot or cold or wet or dry, and then when you determine what the problem is, if it’s too wet for example, they will give you herbs that have the nutrients in it to allow your body to dry up the condition. It’s definitely interesting, and I think we should blend it even more than we do with Western medicine because China has a really good blend of traditional versus Western. They do a good job of that.

 

DAN:

I think the Eastern medicine is pretty fascinating because it’s been around for so long, curing people for a long time before Western medicine. So when did you go to China?

 

JANET:

[Visited 0:07:51.5] about 10 years ago.

 

LEWIS:

Something like that.

 

JANET:

It was right before we got involved with Doctor’s Nutrition because I, at that time, was overweight and trying to walk around China, and I thought something’s wrong here, and they were talking to me in Chinese. And he talked about the wet condition. Well that’s more like the tired and no energy type thing, and that’s what they kept telling me. They’re just like you need energy. I said I do need energy.

 

LEWIS:

Well, she says she was overweight. You know that’s a relative term, maybe 15 pounds.

 

JANET:

Well, I went from a size 6 to a size 12 in a year, so to me that was overweight. I didn’t carry it well.

 

DAN:

You know me working in the hospital I know that the labs are very expensive, and a lot of doctors, you know they look at certain testing more from a treatment standpoint. So let’s talk a little bit about that. How did you come to start the company, and what caused you to think about offering these lower-cost labs?

 

Breaking Down the Barriers to Good Health

 

JANET:

Well basically we – Dr. Lewis takes tons of seminars, and they always discussed doing functional medicine basically what it’s called, but the concept was if we take the barriers down we’re able to help a whole lot more people get well instead of –

 

LEWIS:

We have friends that practice this also, and kind of took us under their wing. The thing about it is I always defend the medical profession. Being in natural medicine we get people in that are anti-medical. And I say no, you should never do that. Your doctor is not the issue. Your hospital is not the issue. It’s just that they have their hands tied within parameters of standard of care or what the insurance company will allow, and so that’s where you see not enough lab work done, and people say sometimes well you do too much lab work. I say well you know you’ve had $10,000 worth, and it has not uncovered the problem. So when I throw – when I take lab work I throw a big net. You know it’s kind of a fishing analogy, but so what that I give it away at cost? I don’t make that much money, and I give my time away. It’s like yeah, you just buy your supplements from me because supplements have such a huge difference in quality, in the variations and all that, so –

 

JANET:

We just basically wanted to take the guesswork out of what they needed for nutrition instead of being like the neighbor down the road that said well it worked for Aunt Mary. Go try a bottle of it, and it may or may not work for you. The lab work shows us exactly what’s missing with nutrition, and then the supplements that we use are pharmaceutical-grade, which means they will actually move the lab values.

 

LEWIS:

They actually have to have third-party verification. It has to be within 5% of what it says on the label where one of the studies I read said with vitamin D it can be 20-something percent of what’s on the label or 140-something percent. It’s like well that – and  most vitamin D doesn’t really work that well. And it has to do with GI function, what your uptake can be. So there are so many different variables. So when we check so many different things you can say well, okay, your thyroid is not where it should be, but is that an adrenal – additional problem with the adrenal glands being stressed because they have that adrenal thyroid axis you have to consider.

 

DAN:

Yeah, I was just at the doctor maybe four or five months ago doing my annual physical, and I work in the hospital. I hadn’t realized – they used to just order a bunch of tests, and this time he’s like I’m not really going to order any labs because insurance companies don’t pay for them anymore. So that even kind of came as a surprise to me because they used to just order CBCs and counts and all that. But they are really tied by what the insurance companies allow. I pulled up one of your panels, and so if we can talk real quick about not the importance of every single one, but so you have CBC with differentials, CMP, lipids, thyroid, C-reactive protein which I hear a lot about, A1c, iron panels, vitamin Ds. What would you consider the key tests that you would always order somebody to get kind of get a baseline?

 

LEWIS:

Well, again, I have to order a lot. One of the things we deal with is on the CBC you look at the neutrophils, the lymphocytes, and you know they should be in a certain ratio, not in the reference range off to the right because that reference range covers the majority of America. And just because it’s common does not mean it’s optimal or healthy, and there are so many people that come in, well their neutrophils over a period of months or years have gone down. Their lymphocytes come up. And it’s usually a viral pattern that can be Epstein-Barr, or mono, or the cytomegalovirus, and then if the monocytes are very high, you know monocytes generally should be under a seven. If they’re high and stay high that would indicate probable allergies and inflammation. Eosinophils, for example, that’s a white blood cell that comes out when you have digestive incompetence or food allergies or sensitivities to the chemicals in our environment. And there are many, many, many chemicals that are interfering with proper function. And we test cortisol because who is not stressed? Whether it’s chemical stress or financial stress, you know there are so many different stressors. We check that. That should be in a more optimal range. We do about five – well, we do five parts of the thyroid. I cannot tell by just TSH, the stimulating hormone, what’s happening with the thyroid, and from a natural point of view the things that interfere with thyroid function are the plastics and pesticides or the chlorines or the bromines or the fluoride in your toothpaste. And so if the TSH – generally it should go low, but the one that I think is most important is Free-T3, the active hormone.

 

JANET:

I think many times they test just the TSH, which is the brain getting a signal, and the true thyroid function is in the Free-T3. So many times we find they actually need thyroid or have been given too much thyroid based on the TSH. So that’s why we like to run the different parts.

 

LEWIS:

Or C-reactive protein. You know the Cleveland Clinic, which is I know arguably the best heart clinic in America – I’m sorry to say that, but I said arguably. But they think that the C-reactive protein, the high-sensitivity one, is about four times better indicator of a future heart attack and stroke than your cholesterol levels. And I personally think the cholesterol levels are artificially low, the reference ranges, because cholesterol is important in rebuilding the brain. It’s important in making hormones. It’s important in every cell in the body. So you have to be careful about wanting to lower it without checking is there enough inflammation to make it stick in the first place? And we can go further with the cholesterol testing to get into the Apolipoprotein A and B or the particle sizes. The sizes are more important than the numbers in itself, but I never interfere with what the medical profession does because that’s not my training. But we can add nutrients and make great changes and decrease say the inflammation from a C-reactive protein.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that’s interesting. I hear a lot of, typically women, that have thyroid issues, and I see you have written a book, Thyroid Sniper. Is that such a big problem that you decided to write a book about it?

 

LEWIS:

Well, yes, it’s a huge problem. And it’s not just women, but I think women actually pay attention to their bodies much better than men. That’s why they out live us, and they’re prettier than we are, but you know, I’ve read dozens and dozens and dozens of thyroid books, and Janet says well you need to quit recommending all these different books and write your own. And I said okay, no big deal. Well I got into it, and basically I’m more of a shoot straight kind of guy. It’s like well, here’s the nutritional deficiencies that can add to a thyroid problem or not be in an optimal range. Here are the plastics, pesticides, the MSG, the additives. It’s lack of zinc and selenium and tyrosine and iodine, and then I went into the Hashimoto’s, the autoimmune disease, and I said some of the books out there say you should never, never give a person with Hashimoto’s disease iodine. Other books say you can give them 50 to 75 mg, which is a massive dose of iodine. So I said in this very short book, what you have to do is look for a medical and/or natural practitioner that can balance it because it’s not either or. You’re an individual, and you should be treated as such.

 

Non-Compliance, Self-Diagnosis and the Desire for Instant Gratification

 

DAN:

On the thyroid though do you find that – actually maybe just not the thyroid, just overall, do people comply with your recommendations? I’m guessing if they come to you they’re looking for new recommendations, but in general it doesn’t seem like compliance is that great. So that people continue to experience health problems, and they kind of know the answer. What’s your take on that?

 

JANET:

Do you all have that issue also?

 

DAN:

Yeah, I mean I always like to say we now have wheelchairs that accommodate 1000-pound patients, and I think that kind of sums it up.

 

JANET:

That’s true. Our issue is that they always look it up on Google and tell us what’s wrong with them.

 

DAN:

That is so true. I thought we were supposed to bring in our Google print out.

 

LEWIS:

We do have some compliance problems. Some people really jump on it and say can you add another supplement, can you add another one, can you add another one? And then you have the ones that want it instantly because we’ve become a society that wants instant results even though it takes God nine months to make a baby, but they expect us to pull it off in three weeks. We say well, you’re looking for a miracle. Then you have people that don’t love themselves enough to – they’ll know that’s the answer but they don’t really love themselves enough to help create the outcome. So yes, there is a compliance problem. We talk to some medical doctors, and I’ll be frustrated, and they say listen, most of them don’t even fill our prescriptions much less take them as directed.

 

DAN:

That is actually one of the major problems we have with patients that we discharge out of the hospital. They don’t get prescriptions out of the ED either, and then they’ll end up back in the hospital. I would just think, though, if somebody is reaching out to you through your website and looking for this, then they probably would be more compliant. Speaking of, you mentioned GI problems, and working in a hospital there’s a lot of business people and stressed out nurses. And how does stress, anxiety, affect GI issues?

 

The GI Tract and its Overall Effect on your Health

 

JANET:

They quit going to the bathroom. I’m almost famous for this. That’s one of the first things we ask someone is how many meals a day are you eating, and most of them will tell us three, and then we’ll say well, how many bowel movements are you having a day? And so many people have one or none a day, and they’ll go I go every couple of days. And I tell them well, if you had three trains that go through a tunnel, how many should come out on the other side? And they’re like – and if they’re not coming out, then where did they go, which is the bigger problem. And I try to tell them all of it goes to organ health. And you talk about nurses. Many of them come in and go we just don’t have time to go. We’re on shift work, and we just can’t take the time. So a lot of it starts then, when they’re young in school. They can’t – they don’t get time to go, and you start making pockets in that colon, and then they start having health issues because that all goes to organs.

 

LEWIS:

And then you guys have to treat them for diverticulitis. There are so many challenges to gut health, and I try to make the analogy of your GI tract has everything to do with stress, anxiety and depression. I actually gave that talk to a group of, a big medical group here in Longview. Stress, anxiety and depression is not all in your head. And I referenced it with medical research, and the MDs and PhDs and psychiatrists and dentists came up and said man, you’re absolutely – wow, where did you come from?

 

LEWIS:

I said I’ve been here very, very quietly just taking care of people and using your research. There is so much research out there about neurotransmitters, and most of us have impaired digestion anyway. We don’t really produce hydrochloric acid. Most of us that think we have high HCl actually have low HCl, and that’s from, to a large degree, lack of digestive enzymes because of the plastics and pesticides and because of wheat. There is a study that says wheat can cause schizophrenia, and I tell people if you just give up anything containing gluten, there’s many, many people that get well. So we don’t digest real well, and then it doesn’t sterilize what comes in there. And then the virus, yeast and fungus can go on in further down and set up shop. So it’s an intestinal dysbiosis or too much Candida usually, and it can be as simple as – there’s a good research that talks about cow’s milk. If you consume it for a long time actually increases permeability, and that actually is counteracted by the Lactobacillus probiotic you talk about. That’s from the Journal of Gastroenterology. It’s a really good study. There are so many different ones. There’s ones that talk about lack of B complex. And they say well, but I’m eating my greens. Yeah, okay, you live in Texas, but you’re getting your greens shipped from California, and it’s a sprayed with Roundup. So there is a problem there that challenges the good bacteria in your GI tract. So it’s a multitude of different problems that cascades in, and like the Candida, they will pretty much prevent GABA, dopamine, serotonin, etc. etc. because we have a nation full of stressed and depressed people. So look to the GI tract, assimilation of nutrients and the inability to eliminate properly, like Janet said.

JANET:

Gas, bloating, belching. That’s how you know you’ve got the problem.

 

DAN:

I was going to ask you, so like what is the typical number of bowel movements you should have a day? I was just curious from your comment about three.

 

JANET:

Well if you’re eating three meals you should be going three times a day. You should be going within 30 minutes to an hour after a meal.

 

DAN:

I think you just shocked every listener right now.

 

JANET:

But that’s exactly where everything starts, and then the rest of these problems generally come from that was never taken care of.

 

Gluten Sensitivity

 

DAN:

A couple questions about what you were talking about. Is gluten sensitivity becoming more accepted, because a few years ago it was more of a conspiracy theory, but it seems that gluten intolerance is more mainstream now? Are people understanding that that come to you?

 

LEWIS:

I think the doctors are becoming more aware of it, and there’s more research that proves that it’s true, but you know we have to understand that the way we fertilize our food with NPK actually stops the plant from chelating and up-taking calcium and magnesium and potassium, etc. etc. I’ve been on some pretty big podcasts, and we’ve kind of had this friendly argument about whether wheat was genetically modified or not, and these people that are much more knowledgeable about agricultural practices than me said gluten is only four times higher than it used to be just a few decades ago. Well if you look at what gluten does to the microvilli of the intestines and how that impedes nutrient uptake, some of the research actually says there’s 40 times more gluten in wheat than there was back in the 1970s. So yes, it’s becoming more mainstream, but I think the doctors are seeing more of the celiac and Crohn’s disease and things like that, or even mild gluten intolerance. And some of that is genetically driven. I don’t like to interpret genetic testing because that’s a little bit over my head, but there is some really good genetic testing that talks about gluten intolerance, and we have it to different degrees. And now we, our society, has about 50% of us have a broken gene called five MTHFR, five methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, but to different degrees depending on which gene. I’ve got one genetic SNP on 677. So that can lead to gluten intolerance, on the same token can lead to stress, depression, obesity, many types of cancer, fibromyalgia, obesity and the inability to lose weight. I mean that MTHFR gene can cause all sorts of problems, including infertility.

It just goes on and on, and it takes a person – you were talking about compliance – it kind of takes them to be willing to say I’m going to get off Google and let my doctor lead me because that’s one of the problems in America is we’ve become a nation that is so full of knowledge but not understanding and wisdom, and I have to tell people every day. You know, one of my heroes is Einstein, and Einstein said something to the effect of you can’t fix the problem with the same consciousness you had when you created the problem. And people are taken aback by that. It’s like well, I think I’m pretty smart, but I’m not smart enough to fix my own problem. It’s like Janet Googled one time – we were in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and I went on to bed and she wasn’t feeling good, and I woke up the next morning. She said I found out my problem. I got on Dr. Google. I said great, what’s the issue? She said I have prostate cancer. So I tell people stay off Google.

 

DAN:

You know my strategy is if I have a headache and the first thing that pops up says I have a brain tumor, I just go to find something until it just says don’t worry about it, and then I’m good. That’s my theory.

 

LEWIS:

That’s a good one.

 

DAN:

It can actually put you in panic if going on Google because it’s always – I think people are just tuned into the worst-case scenario. But that’s funny. So this is a low-carb podcast, and it sounds like you’re definitely anti-grain. What’s your nutritional approach?

 

JANET:

Well, that’s the big thing. We tell them to stay away from grain, and they’re like okay, well I don’t really eat bread, but I’m having cereal in the morning, and –

 

LEWIS:

And they think macaroni and cheese is a vegetable.

 

JANET:

Right, noodles. So we tell them no pasta, rice, bread, potatoes. And we try to get them – we tell them to eat like the farmers used to eat. Eat the lean meats and vegetables and shop around the outside edges of the store, and stay out of the middle.

 

DAN:

That’s what I say, too, exactly. I agree with everything you’re saying, and I’m going to get back to this concern with plastics. But I try to buy organic and local vegetables, and I don’t think people realize that your bright red strawberries that came from wherever are probably painted bright red. You don’t grow strawberries in Illinois in the winter, I don’t think, unless I missed that farm. I’m not sure. But yeah, so I agree. I say that all the time. Stay on the outside aisles, although the local store now has Twinkies on the outside aisle, so you have to kind of jog by them because I don’t think Twinkies are naturally-made. So what are your tips around – back to the gut for a second – on taking good care of your gut? And then how do you avoid the plastics and the Roundup and all that?

 

LEWIS:

You can’t really avoid it, but it’s really good to cut the amounts down. You don’t microwave in plastic. Styrene and Styrofoam cups is one of the things that the body has incredible amount of difficulty to detoxify. We’re drinking filtered water out of plastic bottles, so that’s not good. So Janet and I have a big reverse osmosis system in our home, and that helps. And even the dogs and cats will choose reverse osmosis over the tap water. So even the dogs and cats have a wisdom.

 

JANET:

We tell them if you’re going to buy bottled water, which you can’t get around all of it, but you can at least make better choices. Look on the bottles and make sure they say filtered with reverse osmosis and not just spring water. We’ve got a place here that would make you think it’s coming out of the rolling hills of Colorado, and it’s completely clean, and it’s coming out of a place here that I wouldn’t put my animal over there to drink that water.

 

LEWIS:

I used to be on a deer lease in that county, and it’s like the things you know went on on the deer lease you wouldn’t drink that water anyway.

 

DAN:

So why is reverse osmosis so good for you?

 

LEWIS:

For the most part, at least to my understanding, it really does filter out some of the smaller things. It gets all of the cysts and things like that. But it will filter out about 99.9% of the fluoride and the chlorine. I understand why they use that to be a disinfectant, but the chlorine-based pesticides are one of the biggest causes of cancers. Well, there are so many of them. And that five MTHFR gene, we’re talking about genetic expression being altered just by what’s in the GI tract. So it’s very important that you take probiotics – and they’re not all the same.

 

JANET:

And not from yogurt.

 

LEWIS:

Yeah. It’s really good to learn to ferment your own also. But yeah, some of the yogurts, like yeah, it’s a big falsehood. And I’ve listened to one guy that was an FDA inspector that said there was one brand of yogurt that claimed they had a particular type of probiotic in there that didn’t even exist, and you know there’s a lot of falsehoods and distortions in advertising. Some to advertise they’ll say well it’s all natural. That doesn’t necessarily imply that it’s good or that it’s pesticide-free. So organic and at the farmers market if you know your farmer and you know how they raise their animals and grow their crops, that helps a lot.

 

JANET:

Gut health also, a big thing that we give people are digestive enzymes, which are not probiotics. A lot of people think that’s the same thing. The probiotics are good bacteria for the gut where the digestive enzymes help you break the foods down. The problem with most of them is that they are plant-based. So they don’t break down the meats. We’ve got one that we use here that we really like that has ox bile in it.

 

LEWIS:

Has enough live lipase to help with the fats, protease and a little bit of hydrochloric acid.

 

JANET:

And it mimics human digestion. So it helps you break the foods down, and you’ll know it works because it stops the gas, bloating and belching.

 

Treating the Person, not the Disease

 

LEWIS:

So you know when you talk about your hospital and your conventional docs, do they notice that there is a great increase in say gastrointestinal problems in children, failure to thrive, and colic and throwing up their formula and things like that?

 

DAN:

That’s a good question. I think most doctors just kind of treat the patient as they come. It’s more of I look at the doctors – and we have great doctors. I say that all the time, but they kind of do the typical physical, and if you have a problem they’ll treat it, and there’s not a lot of focus on what we’re talking about here today, about let’s get down to the root cause of the problem. I think we just, our medical community, we just treat the problem, and –

 

LEWIS:

Well, they’re too busy.

 

DAN:

Oh, they’re so busy.

 

LEWIS:

Much of the ones I know.

 

DAN:

Yes, they’re so busy, and where 20 years ago you would have, a doctor would sit with you and actually would come to your house 30 years ago, and now they get exactly whatever it is, six minutes to see a patient, and then they’ve got to go chart and spend a lot of time staring at the computer. And it’s really changed the way medicine is. I’ve interviewed several doctors, and they say we had one course in nutrition in med school. They have no idea about nutrition, and that’s why I think it’s so complementary, the two approaches.

 

  1. LEWIS:

They’re getting more and more cooperative. It’s amazing the ones, the medical doctors that say well okay, you don’t have insurance. Go to Doctor’s Nutrition and get your lab because we’ll do it so inexpensively. And you know we have some doctors that say well, you need olive leaf extract, you need vitamin D, you need K2. They just go on and on. There are some that do that. We have several doctors here that we work with on the thyroid because sometimes you can cut it with our natural approach, and sometimes you might need Synthroid or Armour or something like that. And I don’t know that this is going to happen, but we have a possibility of going to a pretty large entity and utilize vitamin and mineral supplementation to see if we can decrease ADD, ADHD, anger, aggression and violent behavior because there is so much research done by good medical places like Journal of the American Medical Association, Journal of Gastroenterology, that says once you get enough of these nutrients, violent behavior or ADD, ADHD can be greatly, greatly diminished. And that’s why I’m a big – I’m in favor of probiotics because they can help you make your own serotonin, which, when we give out the supplement that has serotonin or creates serotonin people come back and say oh my God, that’s the peace of God in a bottle.

 

DAN:

I think it will take a couple big, well-known health systems to embrace this, and then I think it will start changing. But the other thing that I was going to mention is the financial incentives are not aligned around prevention. Hospitals and doctors, they all get paid to treat. We’re doing some things around trying to prevent illnesses, but until the incentives change I think it’s going to be a slow road. I attended a conference in Colorado. There were several physicians and chiropractors there, and they talked about what they’re doing. But it was kind of antiestablishment. It’s a movement that is definitely starting, I believe.

 

LEWIS:

If we have the best medical profession in the world, and again I really believe we do, then why is America so unhealthy? I try to cut this down to a formula, and this is not original for me. But you have to, number one, remove the toxins, the organisms that grow that aren’t supposed to be there and the harmful foods. That’s a podcast all in itself. Then you have to replace digestive enzymes, and then you have to re-inoculate the friendly organisms, which takes a long time to do because of the challenges to these friendly organisms. Then you have to repair the gut leakiness, which can be done with the digestive enzymes and probiotics. And you know there are so many different ones, like you know from nutrition, cancer and the Journal of the Gut that just talks about fish oil and fiber and how much that actually decreases intestinal permeability. There are so many really good studies. But then again, you can’t go to the big box store and get fish oil because some of that fish oil is so polluted where it comes from, and some of it is very oxidized. You have to know what you’re getting. You have to know that it’s third-party tested. You have to know that the assay is true, and there are some fake foods, and there’s also some fake supplements out there, too.

 

DAN:

I want to get back to your supplement line, but for the average listener what are maybe the top things that they should be doing right now to get a handle on their health if they’re following the typical diet, the typical lack of exercise? What would be like the first steps that you would recommend?

 

Steps toward Getting a Handle on your Health

 

LEWIS:

This is probably not where you think it would go. I would try to ask them to find your need behind the need. Why do you want better health? And it’s not – people say I want to feel better. Yes, but what else? And when you get them down to the motivation, well I want to be able to see my four-year-old graduate high school and get married. And then you have that internal motivation. Again, I think America has become a nation that is addicted to knowledge but not understanding and wisdom. So I try to get people to say well why do you want to get well? And I just talked to a lady before this podcast and she said well, I want to live for my grandkids. I said well you’re 60. You probably have many, many good years left, but you have to get going with it. So get the lab, and that way it takes out a major amount of the guesswork.

 

JANET:

There are so many people that come in here that are on medication, especially for diabetes, and when we run their three-month blood sugar they are still extremely high. And they say well I’m taking the medicine. And I think they think that gives them a flag that says go, go ahead and eat whatever you want. I’m taking this medicine now; it’s all good. And somehow you need to understand you’ve got to take personal responsibility for your own health. A pill or drug is going to help, but it’s not going to fix the root cause of why. And if you keep putting in the same things you’re going to wind up dying early. I watched my grandfather lose both of his legs to diabetes, and that’s genetically in my family. So I take active steps now to eat better and do things that I know will make a difference. And I do keep tabs on my lab, and I make sure I take control of it because it’s not the miracle drug that’s going to save you.

 

DAN:

I agree with both of your points. On the why, you have to have a why because what I see is people be like oh I want to lose weight, and then I said this on previous podcasts, then the default is I’m going to go get a chicken breast and some broccoli. And then two days later they’re eating cake. So because they don’t have a why; they just want to lose weight. And it has to be a real why, like you want to have a good quality of life with your kids or something, something that’s going to motivate you. Don’t you think we’re – I mean, the pharmaceutical industry is so powerful, and the commercials are you’re kind of walking through the tulip field or whatever, and I think we’ve convinced everybody that you don’t have to change anything. Just take a pill, and if it doesn’t work you can take two.

 

JANET:

You talked about going to China. I think the big eye-opener for us when we were in China is how small everyone is there. We were big, and we’re not big people. And I think America sees other Americans that large, and they assume that’s normal. And unfortunately we’ve got a warped sense of what normal is supposed to be. And if they saw people, what they were supposed to look like – look at the old pictures of the people back in the olden days, your grandfather and them, the black and white pictures. Those people weren’t big.

 

LEWIS:

And you see people that way now and people automatically assume they’re anorexic, bulimic or have AIDS. And it’s like no, that’s what normal should become. When we would see an overweight person in China that was about as rare as having the fat kid 50 years ago in the class. There was always one, but it was rare. And I think it’s the addiction to the carbohydrates, and I appreciate what you do with the low-carb thing. It’s like if you’ll get away from the government-subsidized wheat, soy and corn and start eating something different, if they subsidized broccoli and cauliflower and good other vegetables, the kale and arugula, then and maybe then it would get cheap enough that people would begin to consume something that was nutrient dense.

 

JANET:

At the least very least cut your portion sizes in half. What they’re feeding you now is enough for two or three meals in one sitting. Dr. Lewis and I, when we go to eat I guess people think we’re cheap. I don’t know, but there is no way we can eat that kind of quantity that they put on the plate.

 

LEWIS:

We share a meal and then leave about – of the half that we have we usually leave some of that sitting because it’s like I don’t want to eat that much.

 

DAN:

Well yeah, just the McDonald’s portion sizes, what is now a kid’s meal used to be the main meal, the small little paper package of fries, that used to be the normal fries. Now you get a large, and it’s like I don’t even know, a pound of fries or something. I mean you’re right; it’s crazy. And I’m turning 50 this year, and you’re right that when I was in school there was maybe one overweight kid. That was it. And now if there’s one kid that’s normal size it’s –

 

JANET:

He’s the odd one.

 

DAN:

Yeah, it’s such a crazy turn of events, for sure. Well, we’re kind of running out of time, but I do want to get back to your supplements because it sounds like you have a really high quality line of supplements, and if you would you’ve kind of mentioned a few parts of it, but why are they so high quality?

 

Doctor’s Nutrition Supplements

LEWIS:

Well because I have a guy that’s smarter than me in chemistry, and he will not accept anything but the absolute very best.

 

JANET:

That’s the Doctor’s Nutrition line.

LEWIS:

We do have some other lines that are pharmaceutical grade. Why are they better? Because I don’t know, we just won’t compromise. If there’s – you know, we had our Andro-Build the other day. It came in to the original Doctor’s Nutrition and said it tested, like there was a tiny bit of gluten in the deer velvet antler. It’s like well there shouldn’t be any gluten at all, but we didn’t package it up. We’re going for totally gluten-free. So you just don’t compromise because what you put into the temple of the Holy Spirit does matter, and I’m sorry if I offend people with that term, but that’s the way I look at it.

 

JANET:

And the products we have here are generally three to five times stronger than what you’re buying over-the-counter. We have some companies here that won’t allow us to just advertise our products online without them making an account because they want to make sure that person is a customer of ours, and we’ve counseled them on how to take the product because it is strong enough to actually move lab values. And some people don’t need the things they think they need without having a consultation with a doctor. That’s why we run the lab, and cortisol, one of the big ones on there for stress, so many people think well I’m tired. I need something to help me out and jack me up. Well, we’ve got things that do that, but sometimes they’re way over – their cortisol is too high. They actually need to calm down. So without lab you don’t really know which way to go, and the stuff is just not safe for them to take without knowing.

LEWIS:

It takes a pretty fair amount of nutrition for a pretty fair amount of time before your body can make those physiological changes.

 

Contacting Dr. Lewis and Janet

 

DAN:

Tell us about how we can get a hold of you if somebody wants to begin this lab process and get a consult with you and look at your supplements. How can they reach you?

 

JANET:

They can go to our website, acutabovenaturals.com. There you will see a health survey that’s at the top. We ask you to fill that out first because it comes right to Dr. Lewis, and he likes to look at it and evaluate what he thinks you need. We have the different lab panels there, and if you have recent lab, you can send that. He doesn’t charge for any of that. He gives away his time, which he’s running out of, but he does give it away.

 

LEWIS:

I stay behind, but we kind of make it happen. If somebody wants to get well we make sure we give enough of ourselves to make it happen.

 

JANET:

They can also call us, but we generally ask them to fill out the health survey first. That way we know what medications they’re taking because we don’t want to interfere with anything they’re on, and we want to know surgeries and that kind of thing, what’s going on with them and what they’re looking to achieve.

 

LEWIS:

Family history.

 

DAN:

So is this available anywhere, so it would just be a local lab would draw it? Is that how it works?

 

JANET:

Right. They fill out the health survey, and then what we do is figure out – we use Quest lab.

 

DAN:

Which is everywhere, yeah.

 

JANET:

Yeah, and in Texas we use LabCorp.

 

DAN:

Which is everywhere.

 

JANET:

Right, right. And generally there is one very close to them, and we figure out which one is close to them, and they draw the lab for us, and then the results come back to us. So then we are able to go over it with anybody anywhere in the United States.

 

DAN:

Do you do telephone, or Skype, or how does that work?

 

JANET:

Telephone. We do telephone. I email them everything that Dr. Lewis wants them to have so they have a printout of everything. They have access to all of their lab records. So it’s one-on-one without actually being here, but we try to compensate for that in other ways.

 

DAN:

And then if somebody wants to work with you long-term then they could hire you to do that?

 

JANET:

Right. A lot of people do. We tell people that with nutrition it takes a minimum of three months to start getting well, and it’s not our law. It’s God’s law. It takes three months to make changes in the body, and then it’s a month for every year you’ve been sick, and that’s how long you look at getting well.

 

LEWIS:

Well, that kind of gives them a reality check that it’s not going to be fixed in three weeks, something that’s been going on for 30 years. And I hear this from the conventional doctors. They say you know these guys want me to pull off a miracle with some pill after they’ve abused their body for 40 years, and it’s like you know we try to give them some reason to be realistic.

 

DAN:

That’s awesome. Well, any other points you want to share?

 

LEWIS:

You just find a reason for living. There is a difference between living and existing, and I tell people death is not wrong. We’re all going to die, but I think the biggest sin in life is being here and not really living while we’re here. So there’s a reason for that, and I try to dig deep into well you’ve got to love yourself enough to do it, or you have to have a spiritual reason, or you have to do it for your spouse. And I take more supplements out of respect and love of Janet. Of course she gives me digestive enzymes, and I wonder if that’s not so she can avoid the gas, bloating and belching later. I don’t know.

 

DAN:

That is her why.

 

JANET:

I do it out of love.

 

DAN:

That’s awesome. That’s great advice. Well we are –

 

LEWIS:

We try to make it fun.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that’s awesome. And it’s such a great service you’re doing, and I think it’s a great service that you have with these labs because for those that haven’t went to a hospital, they are very, very expensive. And so this is an alternative that people can afford, and they can get a handle on their health.

 

JANET:

That’s it. That’s what we’re trying to do.

 

DAN:

So cool. Well, Dr. Lewis and Janet, thank you so much for Skyping in from Texas. This has been a very interesting podcast, and we will link everything in the show notes to your website, and hopefully people reach out and get some of these tests started.

 

JANET:

Good. We appreciate you having us on.

 

LEWIS:

It was a pleasure.

 

DAN:

Thank you so much, and keep doing what you’re doing.

 

JANET:

Okay, thank you.

 

DAN:

All right. Thank you.

 

2 Comments

  1. Maria Hamilton

    Request podcast notes – really enjoyed this podcast.

    • Dan Perryman

      Thanks for listening. Show notes will be up in a few days. Glad you enjoyed!