40-50-60-wellness

When Allan Misner was in his 20s, he was in top shape and competed in various athletic events, but as he got older, he had to let his fitness go to prioritize his career. He did succeed in the goals he set out, but he realized he wasn’t happy. He had the motivation and wisdom gained from his youth, but he realized motivation wasn’t enough. This idea was hammered down when he met his current wife. He embarked on a health journey and sought out training. He lost 50 lbs. and shred his fat all the way to 19%. He has since started a fitness program that mainly caters to people past their prime.

Today, Allan joins us to give his insight on the difference in training a young person and a forty-something (or older), as well as give us good tips and ideas when it comes to getting started in living a fit and healthy lifestyle.

“You have to start giving yourself if you want anything.” Allan Misner

On Today’s Episode of the Low Carb Leader:

• Older adults don’t recover nearly as fast. They have to pay close attention to pace and how they do the workouts.
• You don’t have to push yourself through a pain point to see benefits from exercise.
• Older adults suffer from movement issues due to sitting at their jobs for decades. Before they start, they have to solve their movement issues first to prevent injury.
• As you get older the “Why?” of working out changes.
• When you’re old, there’s a passion about fitness now based on how you want to live the rest of your life than back when you were young and just wanted to show off.
• Personal trainers should aim to empower clients to move on to the next level.
• All the good things happen to your body when you’re sleeping.

Allan’s Top 3 tips for overall fitness:

1. Know your WHY and vision
2. Break the hold sugar has on you.
3. Recognize the value of managing stress and getting good sleep

The Takeaway:

• When you have a message that resonates with people, they like that.
• If you help enough people reach their goals you’re going to reach yours.
• Every little change matters just like eating less sugar will significantly reduce your weight in a month.

Reach Out to Allan Misner:

• 40 Plus Fitness Podcast
• Forever Fitness

Subscribe & Review the Low Carb Leader!

Thank you for joining us on this week’s episode of the Low Carb Leader Podcast! Our podcast is devoted to helping you attain optimal performance at work and in life. If the topics and interviews we have shared on this podcast have inspired you, please subscribe to the show on iTunes or Stitcher and leave your honest feedback to help us reach even more Low Carb Leaders.

Don’t forget to check us out on Facebook and Twitter and visit our new website!

 

Read Podcast Transcript

018 – Fitness and Health over 40 with Podcast Host and Personal Trainer, Allan Misner

 

DAN:

Hello, and welcome to The Low Carb Leader podcast. I am your host, Dan Perryman, and you have joined us for Episode 18. In today’s episode we have a very interesting guest, Allan Misner. Allan is the host of 40+ Fitness Podcast, and this is a top 100 podcast on iTunes in the fitness and nutrition category. He is an NASM personal trainer. He has specialties in corrective exercise and fitness nutrition. Allan, welcome to the show.

 

ALLAN:

Thanks, Dan. I’m really happy to be here.

 

DAN:

Yeah, we’re very happy to have you. I pulled up your Facebook page, by the way, and the picture at the top, were you in China?

 

ALLAN:

We were, yeah. That wasn’t the Great Wall, but we were in China. I forget the city, but they had this castle. It was kind of a castle. I guess it was a walled-in village to be more correct. And you literally could ride the bike all the way around. But they said you know, you’ve got to be reasonably fit to make it because we’re only going to be here for an hour. So if you’re not fit you don’t want to try to ride all the way around because you won’t make it in time, and we have to go. So we don’t want to be late. So my wife and I got on there, and we – where you saw that picture was when we had just gotten back after we did the ride. So it was a lot of fun. It was a lot of fun. I took my family to China, and we enjoyed the trip. I like to get my kids out of the country every once in a while just so they can kind of see what we’ve got here and compare and contrast.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that’s an amazing picture. And you have over 12,000 followers on your Facebook page, which is pretty impressive.

 

ALLAN:

Yeah, you know I think when you have a message that resonates with people they like that. They’re going to try to find the places where the information is. I try to share my – I share my podcast there. I share some inspirational quotes, and so it is kind of a place for me to just give positive vibes to people about their health and fitness.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that’s great. And so I was looking through your website and read your story, and I would like you to share that. You came from 255 pounds, and you were almost at 40% body fat. And you did a complete turnaround, and then you went into fitness, became a personal trainer. And you kind of want to walk us through that story?

Allan’s Story

 

ALLAN:

Sure. I would say back when I was young when I was in my 20s and whatnot I was super fit. I was running the ultramarathons, I was playing semipro volleyball. I was just – I would call myself an athlete. And as I got into my career, and marriages, and divorces, and stress and everything else, that kind of went away. And I kind of lost that part of myself. And I just was focusing on my career too much. You’ve got the balance of the three, your family, your fitness and health and then your career. And I had really just poured myself into the career aspect.

 

So I remember sitting on the beach. I was about 37 years old. It was in February, around my birthday, and I’m sitting on the beach, and I’m in Puerto Vallarta. It’s beautiful out, and I’m meditating out on the beach that morning as a stress relief exercise. But I really kind of got hit by the fact that as successful as I was in my career and everything that was going on well for me I was not happy. And I was not healthy. And so you kind of make one of those decisions well when I get back home I’m going to fix all this, and I’m going to get healthy. But I didn’t. And it’s like almost every year I would kind of have one of those moments where I would say you know I really have to do something. I really have to do something, but I wouldn’t. And I really was struggling to figure out why. I knew what to do. Having been an athlete I kind of had that DNA. I just knew what I needed to do, but I just wouldn’t take that next step. I wouldn’t stick with it.

 

And so I met my current wife, and I think it was right around that time that I had the epiphany that the decision is not good enough. Motivation is not good enough. I mean there are people that can make a decision and just do it. They’ll have the motivation and they’ll just do it. But I would say most people fail not because they lack motivation or they lack willpower. It’s because they’re not really committed to the idea of being healthier. They’re not really committed to the idea of what it means, what they’re going to feel like and what their life is going to be like. And meeting Tammy and kind of realizing that as I was going through the commitment with her what that felt like and how that was changing my life and how I had fixed the relationship part of this whole thing, so the only thing left for me to fix was this health thing, and the reason that I hadn’t fixed it is I hadn’t found my why. I really didn’t have a focus on what was the most important thing for me, and it started to be about my wife, my family, my children. And that’s when it kind of all clicked together, and I said you know this is what I have to do.

 

And I went ahead and I started working on my certification for personal training. But it wasn’t so that I could train other people. It really was to fix myself. I knew that I had movement issues, so I got a specialization in corrective exercise. I knew that I needed to improve my nutrition because that’s where the real weight loss was going to come from. So I started studying that and got my specialization in fitness nutrition. So all of that was just really an exercise to be the personal trainer that I needed for myself, but just inside of me. I didn’t really expect to train people, but over the course of that year, basically about 11 months, I was able to drop that weight, and I dropped well over 50 pounds. And I got my body fat from 40% down to 20%, or actually 19%, and ran a Tough Mudder with my daughter. And it was kind of at that point where people were seeing me saying Allan, what did you do? I saw you 11 months ago, and you look entirely different. What are you doing? And that’s when I started explaining to them the changes that I had made, but I also understood that I could tell them how to do it but unless they had the same commitment, had determined their why, had gone through this same exercise I had they might not actually see the results that I saw. So I started actually working with friends to get them healthy, and through that exercise developed my program that I call Forever Fitness. And that’s basically how I work with clients now online is to walk them through the same steps that I took to find my health and fitness.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that’s a great story. So did you leave your previous career for this career?

 

ALLAN:

No, I still have that – you know the interesting thing about personal training is it’s not a high-paying job. Podcasting is even a little worse.

 

DAN:

Is even a lower paying job, yeah.

 

ALLAN:

You know, I actually pay to podcast. So it’s definitely not going to pay the bills. I’m paying somebody else’s is the way I look at it. But you know, the point of that is in recognizing that by fixing myself – and it’s always been a big component I think of being a better person is that you have to start giving of yourself if you want anything, and Gary Vaynerchuk has his way of saying jab, jab, jab, left hook [sic], but I think the better way to say it is Zig Ziglar, when he basically said if you help enough people reach their goals, you’re going to reach yours. So I’m not worried about it. I’ve got a full-time gig. It is high stress; I’ll admit that. That’s my big boogeyman for the most part is dealing with stress. But beyond that it pays my bills, and it allows me to do some things that I love, which is helping people get better.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that’s great. Yeah, a lot of people ask me all the time, they’re like are you making money on the podcast yet? Which just makes me laugh as I walk away. But yeah, it’s one of the most expensive hobbies I’ve ever started. But I really like it. That’s a great story. So today’s topic, we’re going to talk about the differences between the 40+ crowd, which I am 49, and you are over 40 I believe.

 

ALLAN:

Yes, I turn 51 next week.

 

DAN:

Oh, that’s awesome. Happy birthday.

 

ALLAN:

Thank you.

DAN:

Yeah, I don’t turn 50 until December so I’ve got a few days left. And the differences between the 40+ crowd and the younger than 40 crowd, because as I age I can definitely tell the difference in my metabolism, muscle growth, all that. Kick us off with you work primarily with 40+, correct?

 

How Fitness Differs As We Age

 ALLAN:

Yes, there’s a couple of differences. One, quite frankly, we don’t recover nearly as fast as we did when we were younger. And I’ll give you a perfect example of that. You’re sitting there watching the infomercials, and I know you’ve probably heard of this, the Insanity workouts with Shaun T, and they look great, and there’s no equipment involved. I’m like this is perfect. I can put this on my iPad. I can, wherever I’m going, even if I’m traveling for work I can do this in a hotel or do this in the fitness center of the hotel, no problem. Well I got it and I thought okay, well day one they want you to do this little fitness test. So this is just the fitness test. This is not a workout. It’s just a test. I did the fitness test, and I wasn’t entirely happy with my results, as you would expect when you take your benchmark first test. But the next morning I couldn’t get out of bed. I actually had to call in sick for work because I could not move my arms, and I just ached all over. And I’m thinking to myself what did I do to myself with that workout? That was just insane. I guess that’s why they call it Insanity.

 

Anyway, just recognizing as someone who is older, I’m not going to recover from workouts as fast, so I really have to pay attention to my pace. I have to pay attention to how I do the workouts, and I really have to be methodical about that so that as you go through your exercise program you’re getting the benefits without destroying yourself. And I interviewed Maria [sic] Esmonde-White not long ago, and she’s got the book Forever Painless, and the way she kind of puts it is we kind of had this mantra come up of no pain, no gain in the 70s, and she said that couldn’t be further from the truth. You don’t have to push yourself to that extreme pain point to see the benefits of your exercise. You can find that happy medium, that spot, that sweet spot where you’re not damaging yourself but you’re still seeing improvements in your health, fitness, strength, mass, whatever you’re after. You don’t have to kill yourself to do it. So I think that’s step number one is finding the right groove for your work.

 

And then the other piece of it is because we’ve had office jobs, most of us have been sitting at our jobs for decades. We have movement issues. And if we try to do things that everybody else is doing without first addressing those movement issues, we’re going to wreck ourselves as well. So when I’m working with a client I make sure that they can do a good form squat with just body weight before I would ever want to put any weight on their shoulders. They may want to get stronger, but until their movement pattern is flawless we don’t need to be putting weight on their shoulders.

 

DAN:

That’s so true on both issues, recovery. I really like deadlifts, and so but I have found that recovery from deadlifts is not only just a couple days. It can be like 7 to 10 days at this stage of my life because the central nervous system, just the impact that it does to your body. And then movement issues, when I was younger I was in karate so I used to be able to do the splits and stretch out, and it’s very difficult now touching your toes. And I know I should spend the time stretching. I totally agree with what you’re saying here because I have felt the changes throughout my life.

 

ALLAN:

So that’s really what it is; it’s the understanding your body from a recovery perspective and then understanding if you have mobility issues and ensuring that you’re using appropriate form. Much of that was easy, I mean hard for us to manage back when we were in our 20s, but we could get away with it. So ego wasn’t the problem back then. Now ego is not necessarily our friend. We need to manage our egos even more than we did when we were in our 20s. So you want that next heaviest deadlift, per se, like I did, and I’m pushing myself, and I’m like okay I’m going to get this thing. I’m going to get 410, and I did. The problem is I hurt my lower back doing it. And so then there’s now a longer recovery time that I have to deal with, and I’m not in the gym. I wasn’t in the gym nearly as much as I wanted to be during that six-month period of time. So I think that’s the big part is not taking a step back by not paying attention to form, mobility and recoverable.

 

DAN:

So you work with 40, 50, 60-year-olds, maybe even older people. I mean obviously as you get older these issues become worse. Talk a little bit about that. Do you see a pattern as they get older, or is it how they took care of themselves when they were younger?

 

ALLAN:

I’ve seen 80-year-olds that could kick my butt. I’ve seen 40-year-olds that I’m surprised they’re still alive. So I think each of us is going to have our own unique thing. We’re going to be where we are. And you don’t necessarily want to compare yourself with anybody else. You just really want to compare yourself with you. How do you feel and look today, and don’t you want to look and feel better tomorrow? And if you’re on a path that’s causing that to happen, then you’re on the right path. So you have to be real with who you are today.

 

I had a desk job for 25 years, so when I really started getting into things, realizing that my mobility across my ankles and my calves because my calves were really, really tight, I can’t do a good clean squat until I really workout my calves and really do some stretching of my calves to get full dorsiflexion in my feet. Once I’ve done that little bit of work, and it takes me 5 to 10 minutes before my workout, I can then do a full squat with little or no trouble, which makes it that much better for me to get benefits from that squat because I’m not in a poor movement pattern. And so yes, as you work with patients just recognizing that the bodies are a little different as they go, and it does depend on how they’ve manage their health their whole lives because we can slow aging to where, like I said, an 80-year-old can be as fit and healthy as a 50-year-old.

 

 Identify the “Why” in Your Fitness Journey

 

But the other aspect of this is I think as we get a little older the why of our fitness changes a little bit. So I’ll give you an example. When you’re in your 40s many of us in our 40s and 50s, we’re starting to get little grandchildren, these little animals running around that we can buy sweets for and treat wonderfully and then send them home to their parents. And we want to do things with them. Well, you know that involves now not just being a little bit stronger or just being a little bit more cardiovascular fit. You may want to get on the ground with them. So having the mobility and the movement patterns to easily get up and down from the floor might be something that you would add to your exercise program to make sure that you’re very good with that. They might be learning how to start riding a bicycle and you might want to ride a bicycle with them. As they get older and they get more fit, you may want to do things like that. Like I run Tough Mudders, and I’m going to be doing a Spartan Super with my daughter later this year. Those are the things that, you know, your why of your exercise may change a little bit as you age, as the people around you age.

 

And then yeah, when you’re 80 it might just be I don’t want to fall and break my hip, so I’m going to start working on balance and agility and strength to avoid hurting myself if I were to fall. And so I might work more lateral movements just to make sure that I have good basic balance and I don’t fall. So that’s kind of the differences as people get older, what they want to accomplish and what they need to be working on may change.

 

DAN:

Allan when people come to you do they know this, or is this something that you educate them on?

 

ALLAN:

We go through an exploration stage. We talk about where they are in their lives. We talk about self-love. We talk about their commitment, which involves a vision of what health and fitness looks like, which you know could include grandchildren, could be that they want to get back on the bike and do something. I had one guy that – he wasn’t a client, but we were talking, and his deal was that his son lived in the mountains in Colorado, and he wanted to be able to go hiking with him. So he was working on getting himself cardiovascular fit enough to be able to do those hikes. So determining your why and your vision and putting that all together and saying okay, that’s the reason to go to the gym every day, that’s the reason to eat well, because of those things, that’s an exploration that I typically do with my clients at the very beginning because they can’t measure success if success doesn’t matter to them. I could say you can bench press 10 more pounds this month than you did last month. Look at that. And they’ll be like well I’m not trying to be in a bench press contest, so does that really help me? And we can say well, if being able to push their grandchild on a swing a little bit higher is what they want to do, well a bench press might be something that they want to improve. But so it’s really just kind of that measuring yourself on yourself, who you were yesterday and then making sure that you’re going in the right direction with this so that when you get something for the work that you’ve done it truly is something that benefits your life, and it’s not just something ego-based like when I was doing the heavy deadlift. I didn’t get any benefit out of being able to do the deadlift anymore other than satisfying and ego to say I want to hit that benchmark.

 

DAN:

And you look cool in the gym.

 

ALLAN:

Yeah, you know.

 

DAN:

When clients come to you are they typically educated in nutrition and fitness, or I’m sure it’s all the way across the board, but do you see patterns where people just have no idea or they’re really educated?

 

Find What Works For You and Your Nutrition Goals

 

ALLAN:

You know, when I first started because I was doing some personal training when I was in my 20s because again, I was fit. People would walk in the gym, oh he knows what he’s doing; I’m going to ask him to help me. So I did a little bit of personal training back in the ‘90s I mean late ‘80s early ‘90s, and the funny thing was the only thing you could do was you could go to the library and there were some books, or you could order one of the magazines, subscribe to one of the magazines like Muscle and Fitness or stuff like that, and that’s all we really had to go on. Today there’s this thing called the Internet. Some older folks might not know what that is, but it’s this information dump of all this stuff. And so I think so many people have a general idea because there is so much information, but they don’t know how to take that and apply that practically to themselves.

 

So they say well I know that I need to be a vegetarian, and I need to cut out sugars, and I need to not do milk and not do this and not – and when they get done with it it’s like okay I can eat lettuce and kale and that’s it. I can drink water, but not the water from the fountain and not the water in the plastic. And so I don’t know where I’m going to get my water from. But I’m going to have to find water. I guess a creek near my house or something because that’s spring water. I’ve heard that’s good. But you can kind of see there’s so much information out there that it’s like well how do I parse this and put this in a way that I can apply it to myself? And I think that’s where the real challenge is today is to say there is so much stuff out there, and so I have a concept that I call being your own little lab rat, and we talk about okay, let’s talk about what’s worked for us in the past. Let’s talk about what’s failed for us in the past because many of us have tried. You know they’ll sit there and say well I went on Weight Watchers for a while and I lost 10 pounds, and then I gained it back. Or I went on this, I started eating salads for lunch and just drinking water, and I lost this amount of weight and I felt pretty good. Okay, well obviously your body likes vegetables, and so let’s cut down on the sugars, and let’s see keep your proteins moderate, and let’s see how you feel from an energy perspective. And then we can tweak it from there.

 

And so we’ll go back and forth, and I’ll have some clients like I did; I started out pretty much paleo and lost about 25 pounds and then stalled. And I said okay, well I’m stalling at paleo, so what do I need to do next? And then I’m like well, let me try this ketosis thing because it makes sense that if your body is able to burn fat and you’ve got extra fat, well that might be something that works for you. And in fact it did. I dropped the other 25 very, very quickly.

 

So I think there is a lot of opportunities and a lot of information out there, which is good, but you have to figure out how to apply it and how to make it a lifestyle choice, not just a I lose the weight and then I’m going to gain it back because I’m going to go back to eating the way I ate before. If you can make this a lifestyle change you’ll have permanent health effect. You’ll get where you want to go and you’ll be able to stay there. But you have to find what works for you.

 

DAN:

I really like that concept about the n=1, I just mentioned that at the last podcast, but also about the goals. I think that’s really important for people to realize that your goals change. When you’re 20 years old you just want to lift a bunch of weights and show off in the gym, and I get that. But as you age I really like the idea that your goal might be around your grandchildren. It might be around hiking. And I think that’s a really important concept that everybody remembers.

 

ALLAN:

And we still want to look good naked. I mean let’s not kid ourselves.

 

DAN:

Yeah, well, yeah. Mark Sisson says that all the time, right?

 

ALLAN:

Yeah, but it’s not the end-all be-all of what we’re doing. This is not an ego-driven thing anymore. Now there is some passion behind it that go far beyond the ego, and it’s about how you want to live the rest of your life. Do you want to be the invalid, the person that can’t go to the amusement park because you can’t walk that far, or the one that they have to push around in a wheelchair because you’ve had your feet cut off because you have diabetes? You have to think about what you want your life to be like when you’re older. There’s a reason now we’re seeing people in their 80s and 90s still doing amazing physical feats and being healthy and living well into their hundreds is that we have access to all this wonderful stuff, wonderful information, wonderful doctors and medicine that are keeping us alive longer. The question is do you just want to live longer, or do you want to live healthier? And I think for most people the answer is healthier. So it really is about finding your why, lining it up and then now all of your goals, everything lines up with what you wanted to accomplish.

 

So if I have a client that wants to be around their grandchildren I say okay, here’s what I want you to do. I don’t want you to overdo it this weekend, but when you get a chance when your granddaughters are on the ground, get on the ground with her, and I said she’ll lose interest in about five minutes because that’s what they do, and that she’s going to want to get up, and you get up. And I say do that a couple times this weekend. You don’t have to do it many times, but do it a couple times this weekend. Three weeks into this and you’ve got a grandmother that has no problem getting down on the floor as often as the little kid wants to get on the floor and play. And now there’s this connection, this relationship that they didn’t have before because Grandma is being cool and getting on the floor and playing with her rather than sitting in the chair just watching her.

 

DAN:

Yeah, that is cool. Now we grew up in the same era, and I always say when I was in grade school everybody was skinny, and you might have had that one fat kid as we always said, but now obesity – I work in a hospital. Obesity is just epidemic. How have you had to change your personal training because of the obesity issue?

 

ALLAN:

Well obviously I think it has changed goals. When you’re the skinny kid first walking into a gym all you want to do is get bigger. One of the funny things was I was an offensive lineman in high school, but I was very, very light. So I also ran the 2 mile in track, and I was also on the tennis team. So if you can imagine just an athlete that could, you know, was seated and I actually played varsity tennis. I also played varsity baseball some. I played varsity track and did the shot put and was the offensive guard. My best sport was football, but I was too small to go Division I, and even the Division I coaches are like well if he gets over 200 pounds give us a call. I was 32 years old when I got over 200 pounds and it was because my activity level was so high that I never gave myself that chance to put that weight on.

 

Now because you know people get sedentary, like I did, the activity level goes way, way down and the weight goes up. So I think the goals change a little bit because when someone now is overweight going into the gym their thought process is I need to burn calories or I need to work out to lose weight, and that’s only part of it, and in fact a very small part. Weight loss is actually going to be done through what you eat and how much of it you eat. So finding the foods that don’t inflame your body, finding the foods that give you the nutrition that you need and then only eating enough of them to fulfill your needs is really going to be where you’re going to be at if you’re trying to lose weight. You can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet. But so many people think that they can. They think that they’re going to walk into the gym, they’re going to get on that elliptical machine, they’re going to go for two hours every day, they’re going to burn 2000 calories, and they’re going to lose 10 pounds a week, and they’re going to look great. And that’s just not how the math works. Your body will break down before you get to your goal.

 

So I think the thing is just as the goals change I think the way someone walking into the gym changes, and unfortunately you can’t, as a young person your body’s primed for you to put on more muscle. Your body’s primed for you to maintain a lean physique if you’re active. As we get older now, okay, we’ve got movement problems, but we want to just burn calories to lose the weight. And unfortunately you don’t have enough energy. You don’t have the energy you had when you were 20 to do the things that you would do to maintain that. But it is important, but it should be considered holistically across the board with all the other things that you want to accomplish, not just weight loss.

 

DAN:

I don’t think people realize that 60% to 70% of the calories burned during the day are from your basal metabolic rate. It’s not from exercise. So this is leading into a question. I see so many people, like you said, that go into the gym. They’ll get on the treadmill. They’ll go 45 minutes, and then the concept is good, I can go eat a healthy muffin and a juice and now everything is going to be better. And I see people – I’ve been going to the same gym for three years now, and I see the same people working with personal trainers, and they actually look like they’re in worse shape than when they started. How do you navigate your clients through that, and do personal trainers get a bad rap?

 

The Role of a Personal Trainer

 

ALLAN:

I’ll answer your first question first – I mean last question first because I think that’s the – I think some personal trainers deserve the bad rap. If you’re not helping your client reach their goals, and by reach their goals I mean twofold. One is they hit that health or fitness goal they were after, and then two, they become the master. So you now have a student, and you’ll know this from your karate, is many folks that did karate as youths, if they stuck with it they’re eventually becoming the black belt, and now they’re becoming the teacher opening up their own shop. That’s what personal trainers should actually look at themselves as being is teaching them the principles to be healthy and fit and for them to know it so well that it’s time for them to move on, and that they actually now know everything that that personal trainer can teach them and it’s time for them to find the next trainer if they need so, or they become the teacher. So I think that’s one of the things is it can be deserved as a rap if you’re not truly empowering your clients to move to the next level.

 

And then with people going into a gym and whatnot, and with me with my clients, what I’ll basically tell them, if weight loss is one of the goals that they want, then I tell them okay we’re going to do two things here. One, I’m going to hold you accountable. So you’re going to log everything you eat so you know what you’re eating. And what I want you to do is I want you to take a picture of everything you eat and send it to me. And you would be amazed at how that one little thing, the logging now they know how much, but the taking the picture and having to send it to me changes everything because they’ll sit down before they’re ready to eat it, and they’re sitting there with their camera phone about to take a picture of it, and then they have a moment to think. It’s no longer impulse eating. It’s no longer stress eating. It’s a function of oh, I was about to put this bag of potato chips in my mouth. I think I’ll just have one serving. What’s one serving? 14 chips. And then they count out 14 chips and put it in the bowl, put the bag away, and now they’re going to have one serving of potato chips. They just saved themselves probably eight servings that they would have eaten if they took that bag to the couch to watch their nightly TV programs.

 

DAN:

That is a great idea. Actually I’m going to probably share that with others because that’s a great concept.

 

ALLAN:

Yeah, just find a buddy, someone else that’s saying they want to lose the weight, that you know they’re just as serious as you are and say okay, here’s the deal. We take pictures of everything that we’re going to eat before we eat it, and we send it to you. So when I see you have a bottle of water there with your salad and a little bit of tuna, thumbs up. Awesome. But if you sit there one night and say okay we went ahead and ordered pizza, and I had two slices of pizza and a soft drink, well okay, you took the picture of it. You owned it. But you know what you’re putting in your body, and you know why you’re putting in your body, and you’re owning it. So you don’t have to do this with your trainer, but I just say you can find a friend that’s on the same path as you, and you can find them on those services like MyFitnessPal and whatnot that, you know, where you can log and people are supposed to be able to look at your logs. I’d say make it even tighter and do the picture game for a little while and see if that doesn’t change some of your food choices.

 

DAN:

Yeah, and I’m kind of laughing because the concept of a serving, people have no idea what a serving is because I remember, especially eating peanut butter, you know you would have one serving with a spoon which would be a heaping tablespoon, but when you actually measure it out you’re like really, this is a tablespoon of peanut butter? And I was probably eating seven or eight when I was thinking it was one.

 

ALLAN:

That’s common. That’s very, very common because we don’t typically really go through the time to measure our food. But one of the cool things about when you do it for a little while, just a little while, you’ll start to recognize, particularly with your favorite foods, what an actual serving looks like. So I’ll give you a perfect example. You go to Logan’s to get a steak, and their steak is 24 ounces – or 16 ounces, okay, let’s just say 16 ounces. Well, okay, that is actually over four servings of steak, that one 16-ounce steak. And your serving of broccoli that you got is now actually half a serving of broccoli. You should actually be eating twice that. So understanding now that a serving of meat is basically about the size of the palm of your hand, not including your fingers, and you start to recognize that. Now you’re taking pictures of it. You’re getting this mental imagery of what that looks like, what your plate looks like. And it’s just kind of giving you those lifestyle tools. Again, we talk about a lifestyle. It’s not a one-time thing. Now you’re starting to build those skills. You’re starting to recognize when to stop and how to stop and what you should be eating and being mindful about it.

 

DAN:

Allan, how do you encourage your clients to change their nutrition because changing nutrition is very difficult for most people I know. Are there certain tips besides taking the pictures that you give them?

 

ALLAN:

Well, what I like – I’m a big proponent of every little change matters. So if we’re going to fix our metabolism, we’re going to lose the weight and we want our A1c to go down or whatnot, I’m going to say okay, first step, day one, we’re going to cut our sugar below 50 g. And they’re like oh my God, that seems, doesn’t seem hard. But when they actually realize they’re eating 150 g a day, now suddenly they’re like well what do I eat because all this food that I was eating has all this sugar in it. And I say well just get down below 50. And then I’m going to drop a bombshell on you. The World Health Organization actually says we should be below 25 g per day. So let’s take a baby step and get to 50. And once they get comfortable with 50 and they within the first month lose 8 to 10 pounds, which is a real loss – you’re going to see a loss. If you do this, if you eat a lot of sugar now and you just do this one thing, I’m going to eat less than 50 g of sugar per day for a month, at the end of that month you’re going to weigh at least 8 pounds less. And then so we start the first week and we’re like okay, let’s do this. Let’s just do this sugar thing. Okay, now you’re starting to build in, and that’s your sugar thing.

 

Now let’s look at the water, and here’s why you want to drink more water. Your body – and your liver is responsible for managing toxins in your body, and the liver, I’m not going to say it’s lazy because it has a very important job, but it doesn’t like being overwhelmed. And today we are kind of overwhelmed with toxins. So when we’re gaining weight the liver has this really cool way of actually taking the load off of itself, and it does that by storing the toxins in our body fat. And it’s saying well if you’re storing this fat he doesn’t, you know, I don’t need these toxins here either. I’ll just book it up in this fat and let it sit there and it won’t be bothering anybody. And that’s true until we start to lose the fat, and now those toxins are starting to get back into our system. So drinking water is going to help flush that and keep our body moving those toxins out. So I encourage my trainees to drink more water to a point where their urine is basically clear all the time. And if you’re doing that and maybe taking and making sure you’re getting your good electrolytes, salt, magnesium, zinc, potassium, magnesium and zinc, if you’re getting good amounts of those in your foods, then you’re going to be in great shape to even lose more weight. And so there’s these little incremental things that we can do to start to train your body to be more efficient and help give your body what it needs to be more efficient.

 

DAN:

Unfortunately we only have a few minutes left, but what are your top tips that you would give somebody, maybe two or three tips that you would give them to start their journey or to stay motivated?

 

Make Your Health a Priority

 

ALLAN:

I think the first thing is to know your why and your vision. What that will do is kind of give you a grounding. Anytime you wake up in the morning and you don’t want to go, this is your grounding. This is it. And I’ll give you a perfect example. If you told your wife, or spouse or whomever, that you were going to pick them up at the airport at 5:00 in the morning, where are you at 5:00 in the morning? You’re at the airport. If you love yourself enough and you tell yourself I’m going to the gym tomorrow because of my why, you’ll be at the gym tomorrow. And that’s the same kind of commitment that you need to have. So understanding your why and your vision, putting that into a commitment, that’s the first one.

 

The second one is to break the hold that sugar has on you. When we talk about obesity we’re talking about sugar, period. You’re not overeating anything else but sugar. And so if you can get your sugar down low, like low-carb, you’re going to put yourself in a perfect position to burn fat and get healthier.

 

And then the final one is recognize the value of managing your stress and getting good sleep. We didn’t talk about that today. I can come back if you want to talk about it because I think it’s a very big deal, and I know it is for me. But managing stress and making sure that you’re giving your body the rest that it needs, that’s when all the good things happen is when you’re sleeping. So if you’re constantly in a stressed state your body is not balanced, and it’s not doing the right things with its hormones. And if you’re not getting the right sleep you’re definitely not on the right hormone cycle, and you’re not going to see the best results. So making sure that you manage those, too, along the way are also important steps.

 

DAN:

Those three are great. So one final question. What do you eat during a typical day?

 

ALLAN:

It ebbs and flows. I am very much a, I guess for the lack of a better word, an [annualist 0:36:25.8]. I like to think of food in terms of how my ancestors would have eaten, and we would have had access to more carbs and put on maybe put on some body fat over the summer and fall, and then what would have happened was then we hit the winter months, which we’re going into now. I wouldn’t have access to that. So now it’s fish; it’s meat; it’s more fats. If there’s any vegetables they tend to be leafy greens, that type of thing. And so right now I’m doing that cycle back in. So I’ll be in ketosis probably for the next three months, and then as the spring comes on I’ll start eating some fresh berries, starting to take in more fruit and other vegetables that would have a little bit more sugar in them that would be growing around that time of year. So I’m very much about paying attention to how my body would have been adapted to live ancestrally and try to eat that way.

 

So right now I will wake up, probably have some eggs and some sausage, and that will hold me over until late in the afternoon where I’ll typically, if I’m – I’ll do that if I’m not intermittent fasting. But typically that will hold me on until late afternoon. What I’ll do in the late afternoon is I’ll probably have some fish. I like to mix tuna now with this avocado mayonnaise that I buy from actually buy from Mark Sisson. It’s the Primal Blueprint – Primal Kitchen chipotle mayonnaise with avocado oil. It’s awesome. So I’ll make a little salad out of that and put that on top of maybe some kale or spinach, some leafy greens. And then I’ll get into the evening and probably have maybe some beef or maybe even another serving of fish with some low-carb vegetables, and that will be my day.

 

DAN:

Unfortunately we’re out of time, but how can people learn more about you and connect with you if they want to?

 

 

How to Connect with Allan

 

ALLAN:

Okay, well, I’ll give you two places. One is the 40+ Fitness Podcast, and you can go to 40plusfitnesspodcast.com, and you’ll find the links there. We’re [also 0:38:24.9] on iTunes and Google Play and all that, so you can typically find us out there on all of that. And then forever.fitness is where I do my personal training. And each month I do a few different challenges for you to try. So in February the challenges are the burpee challenge, the squat challenge, and we’re doing a sugar challenge. I haven’t decided what we’re going to do in March, but I’m working up a couple things there. So I always like to have some challenges out there to kind of give someone an introduction to what we do as a part of the program. All these challenges are kind of like just one little piece of our alphabet. And so it’s just something simple to try with us, see how it is interacting with me, get to know me and my style, which is very hands-on, and have a good time. So again, you can go to 40plusfitnesspodcast.com or you can go to forever.fitness.

 

DAN:

Well Allan, thank you so much for being on the show today. This has been a great discussion, and I know that listeners have learned a lot. And I hope they reach out to you to learn more.

 

ALLAN:

Well Dan, it’s been an honor to meet you, to be on the podcast and to be able to interact with your audience. Thank you.

 

DAN:

Thank you, and take care.

 

ALLAN:

You, too.

0 Comments

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Benefits of listening to top health podcasts – Site Title - […] features like overcast are being welcomed by all the generations. Specifically, listening to health and fitness podcasts can offer…
  2. Which is the best way to lose weight in office? | The Low Carb Leader with Dan Perryman - […] By standing, you can burn approximately 50% extra calories than sitting and performing the same tasks. By standing and…